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Thread: This is probably a real stupid question.

  1. #17
    Cardiac Nurse JB_OrchidGuy's Avatar
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    Well, I have to put my 2 cents in here. I have to disagree. Granted I have killed some CPs in the past, but personaly I think CPs are much easier to care for than orchids. Now yeah true you can go buy a hybred orchid and basicly ignore it and it will do fine, but when you get into species orchids you can be in for a time getting them to bloom. I guess the major differance is there is basicly a narrow set of general guide lines you can go by and gro CP's. Orchid on the other hand with 25k+ different species, and a bunch of different conditions for each. With CPs I think most people grow them for the pitchers and the looks of the plants. Well, with orchids its easy to get the plant to grow and grow and grow, but if you don't have conditions right the little @%&#er will not bloom. People grow orchids for the flowers not the plant generaly. Now I have only been into CPs again for about a month and so far the ones I have seem to be doing fine. The ones I just recieved seem to be adjusting very well. From my limited knowledge I would say chids are harder to get used to.

    Although really if you look at it growing any plants are easy. Its just recreating what they like that may be difficult. People ask me all the time if growing orchids are hard, and I say no they are just different, and once you learn how they are different then its a peice of cake to grow. Flowering is a whole nother story. LOL Have a darn Maxilaria tenufolia that is growing like a weed, but has never blomed for me yet. I'm trying the burn or die method on it at the moment. LOL Was told by someone give it more light more light. Well, the next place to go was full sun. I heard it worked for some folks on the same plant so I'm trying now.

    I think the best advice I can give is read all you can and don't be afraid to kill something, because everyone will kill some plants along the way. Even the Pro's have the occasional death in the family.

    Ok I'm done rambling.
    JB
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  2. #18
    cockroach's Avatar
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    There's like 15+ different genus of CPs with climate requirements ranging from cold-temperate to tropical to mediterranean. And while some genus are monotypic, others have lots of species. There are around 130 species of Drosera, around 70 species of Pinguicula, 214 species of Utricularia, something like 82 species of Nepenthes.

    I really don't know how difficult orchids are to cultivate. Certainly they have a reputation for being difficult, as do CPs. But even with so many different species, I would assume they'd have more in common with each other than, say, a tropical bladderwort, a dewy pine, a Sarracenia, and tuberous sundew.
    Slave to vegetable hunger.

  3. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]I'm just scared to death I'll kill them!
    I think I speak for everyone here when I say we all started out that way. It's not so much that cps are hard to grow (read: keep alive), rather that one starts to doubt one's self after reading all these forums. Am I doing it right? So and so's plants look SO MUCH BETTER THAN MINE! It just come with experience...and the loss of a few plants. What I've come to realize, though, is that sometimes a lost plant just isn't your fault.

    Just keep on truckin'! Eventually people will be coming to YOU for advice on growing. Then you have to worry about killing OTHER peoples' plants as well as your own!
    LOL!
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  4. #20

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    For cultivation, I prefer "Insect-Eating Plants & How to Grow Them" by Adrian Slack.

    He has several pioneering methods to cultivate some unusual and difficult species.

    I have access to a local "orchid pro". He even travels to the jungles and imports them. The secret for getting orchids to bloom is by using smaller pots.

    I just dabble in orchids. The flowers only last a short time and then there is just this boring plant to look at.

    With CP, there is always something interesting being caught in the pitchers or tentacles. The flowers, for most species, are secondary in interest. The recently acquired - S. wherryi x alata is an exception. The yellow ring of color surrouding the pink is...stunning. Thanks again JBL.

    I look forward to seeing my S. burkii flower - maybe next year. Now, if I can get that yellow ring on the S. burkii cross. Better yet, pink surrounded by white with the yellow ring.

    For the orchids, try drier conditions and maybe some "bloom buster".

    Tweek
    \"The world is a dangerous place, not because of those who do evil, but because of those who look on and do nothing.\" - EInstein

  5. #21

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    I was thrilled, recently, to note that my dendrobium orchid was putting up a bloom spike, and even more recently thrilled to note that it's going to bloom.

    This is the first sucess I've had with an orchid re-blooming, out of many tries. YAY!
    \"People place their hand on the Bible and swear to uphold the Constitution; they don't put their hand on the Constitution and swear to uphold the Bible,\" Jamie Raskin, to Senator Nancy Jacobs.

  6. #22
    apple rings.. what more can i say? FlytrapGurl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Seriously, some people normally put water in the pitchers, irregardless of drought conditions. I think it is S. purpurea that they don't.
    Other way around. S. purpurea is the one you need to make sure have water in the pitchers, otherwise they can't produce digestive fluid. Most other Sarrs don't need water in the pitchers and produce fluid on their own when triggered by the movement of a bug.
    Liquid Plummer
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  7. #23
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Tanya, you're absolutely correct! Elgecko corrected me on that one.

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