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Thread: Captan fungicide?

  1. #1
    Terminus's Avatar
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    Thumbs down

    Today is NOT a good day. I just returned from a trip to find that my patio mini-bog of 4 years appears to be the victim of a fungal infection. It's the usual signs - wilted leaves; dead leaves; and, most notable, rhizomes that have turned brown and spongy, with just a few living white roots remaining. In fact, the s. purpurea, s. flava, and s. psittacina are dead, but the hearty s. wrigleyana lives on.

    Because I am going out of town again on Tuesday for a week and want to at least save some of my plants, my question is this:

    Can I use Captan Garden Spray (48.9%) on my bog in this emergency situation, while I await Cleary's to arrive via mail? If so, does anyone know how much to mix with water?

    Thanks in advance.

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    I'm so sorry about your plants. Would garden sulphur work?

    Captan does work...but be sure to suit yourself up in a full haz-mat wardrobe before you use it.

    http://www.epa.gov/ttn/atw/hlthef/captan.html

    While this epa info makes it sound not so bad...there's tons of anecdotal stuff out there....I hate even walking past the stuff in the garden center. Best of luck!
    \"People place their hand on the Bible and swear to uphold the Constitution; they don't put their hand on the Constitution and swear to uphold the Bible,\" Jamie Raskin, to Senator Nancy Jacobs.

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    No, Captan is not safe.

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    I have used Captan and Benomyl for over 15 years with great success. I would not use anything Sulpher based on anything. Good way to kill everything you got.

  5. #5
    chloroplast's Avatar
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    I've used Captan once in the past two years for a MILD fungal infection on a newly acquired VFT. It helped.
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
    Member, International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS)
    Member, North American Sarracenia Conservancy (NASC)
    Member, The Carnivorous Plant Society (CPS)

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    Appears to be in the process of being reclassified as carcinogenic to humans-
    http://www.tera.org/peer....ic'

    Peer Review of reclassification of Captan
    http://www.tera.org/peer/CAPTAN/CaptanCharge.htm

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    chloroplast's Avatar
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    Actually, I read the report (1st link), and the document was merely a reevaluation of Captan required by the EPAs new classification guidelines (not because of new concerns) and, as such, was simply a summary of all prior data on the carcinogenic potential of Captan (i.e., no new data presented).

    In fact, the document states that "Captan is not likely to be a human carcinogen at levels that do not cause cytotoxicity in the proximal small intestine....and not likely to be carcinogenic to humans in all other organs/tissues or following dermal or inhalational exposure."

    Basically, it boils down to: Captan is likely not to cause cancer if it gets on your skin or is inhaled, and may cause cancer in the small intestine only if eaten at levels at or above a threshold dose (it seems to be dose-dependent) for prolonged periods of time. What's a high dose? Well, if you extrapolate the mouse data to a human male weighting 150lbs, you wold need to eat ~61g/day for many days for you to have a statistically significant elevated risk of getting a cancer of the small intestine!!!! Geeze....almost any insecticide, herbicide, fungicide would probably cause a lot of damage if ingested in such quantities!!!

    Please feel free to critique my math or reasoning. I try avoiding the use of chemicals whenever possible for safety and environmental reasons....but it seems that there's nothing especially dreadful about Captan (compared to most other agents).

    Best regards,
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
    Member, International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS)
    Member, North American Sarracenia Conservancy (NASC)
    Member, The Carnivorous Plant Society (CPS)

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    I'm not qualified to critique your math. Your reasoning is simply stated, your reasoning.

    I've read much of the "anecdotal stuff" out there referred to by a previous poster. I'm of the opinion Captan is not safe and that the Powers That Be saw fit to create new classification guidelines because they too believed the product was not as safe as the manufacturers would have led us believe.

    Basically, what it boils down to for me is that chemical pesticides, herbicides and fungicides are engineered to kill- that's their purpose. Some are broad-spectrum poisons, which kill a wide range of living organisms, others are targeted to specific species. Often, when we're focused on a particular problem in the garden... weeds for example... we can lose sight of the other effects garden chemicals might have. Some chemicals, for example, leach into the soil and groundwater, leaving toxic residues. Others may affect non-target species: the chemicals we use to control an unwanted pest may also kill butterflies, for example.

    In nature, you can't tinker with one small piece of the puzzle without having an impact... sometimes positive, usually negative on many other areas and often without realizing it. That's a potentially alarming responsibility for each of us to shoulder, but it's a basic ecological fact. And it's also what makes the ecological web of connections between all life forms so fascinating and intricate!"

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