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Thread: Darlingtonia in the wild

  1. #1

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    Of the 4 or so Darlingtonia sites I saw all were the same. The sites were predomenantly streams (about 6 inches wide) with serpintine (is that right?) soil on the sides of mountains littlered with rocks and bolders. Another 6 inches consisted of the stream bank for flood times. grasses usually littered the dry(er) areas and P. macorensis filled gaps between Darlingtonia (at one site). The Darlingtonia were usually growing in the stream or with-in 3 inches of it and normally between large rocks (which may have caught the seed). Clones were anywhere from dark red to green (usually green even though not many trees were over head). These clones were anywhere from 3 inches to 3 feet tall. Many "runners" had sprung up all over the place. In general (a couple exceptions undoubtedly) any runners that were over 3 inches from the streams or plants growing where the streams no longer ran were dead. No growth was present. Of course many plants still seemed to be sending up their spring growth but these plants were obviously and totaly dead. Only a few plants flowered on these streams (and I found some seed from last year, which i very different from Sarr. seed).
    Another area where Darlingtonia grew was in the seepage bogs at the bottom of these streams (or more likely part way down) where they covered these bogs en masse and many flowers and new leaves were present. Live Sphagnum commonly grew in these bogs. I don't beleve so many different genets were present based on the fact that many appeared to be the same height, coloration and same features. (note: not all plants had a "cobra-appendage" but I beleve these may have been older pitchers). Many plants were obviously related in these seepage bogs and I doubt maore then a few clones inhabit each bog. The streams on the other hand were full of distinct clones. These seepage bogs were usually shaded at least partially and had very slow moving water.
    So my suggestions for Darlingtonia after this would be to put them in the middle of a cool (shallow) stream ancored by rocks. and dug in. Man-made would probibly be best as you could control the amount of minerals (although Darlingtonia can take toxic levels). The streams were probibly 50-55 degrees (based on sticking my hand in the water). If you could rig a free-on (someone please spell this for me) coil to the water near the top that would probibly do the trick.
    Tre

  2. #2
    StifflerMichael's Avatar
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    It's freon (not free-on) Just trying to help [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

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    Thanks

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    That's a great piece of information.

    Strange how my cobra is fine sitting in still water but being cooked by the sun.
    Alexis Vallance, U.K.
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Alvin Meister @ June 25 2005,7:10)]That's a great piece of information.

    Strange how my cobra is fine sitting in still water but being cooked by the sun.
    Alvin,
    I have a email buddy in Liverpool who grows his as you and never a problem. Maybe Darlingtonia were native to the UK and were transpotted by alien visiters thousands of years ago...

    [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img]

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    LOL [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img]
    Alexis Vallance, U.K.
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  7. #7

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    Well this winter I had limited success (66%) with Dralingtonia in LFS sitting is a (home made) styrofome cooler (only held 1 gallon including the LFS) filled with ice cubes. Standing water was almost always present but when the water level dropped during an weekend trip (only 2 inches) the darlingtonia wilted and died, I think). Now if only I could get a freon coil without poisoning myself in the prcess.

  8. #8
    emilias_garden's Avatar
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    Exclamation

    Hello guys! I am sorry for my ignorance, but what is a "Freon coil"?

    I woulld like to know what is this, so i can have the info completly [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smilie4.gif[/img]

    Thanks,
    Jorge Joel...
    Emilia's Garden

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