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Thread: This sucks

  1. #9
    VFT and Drosera lover vft guy in SJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Mannex17 @ July 01 2005,12:44)]I don't get it. I thought that Sarracenia liked boggy, wet conditions. How can I prevent root rot and also do that?
    WELL draining soil, and let the water trays run dry for a few hours between waterings.

    I have found that Sars prefer to be top watered. I pour enough water into the pot so that when it drains out the water level is about 1/4 of the way up the side of the pot.
    There are only 2 infinite things... the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not too sure about the universe.

  2. #10
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (vft guy in SJ @ July 01 2005,3:58)]I have found that Sars prefer to be top watered. I pour enough water into the pot so that when it drains out the water level is about 1/4 of the way up the side of the pot.
    Steve, I have mine in a mini-bog (a bucket). Would you say that a bucket, being a larger version of a pot, would also benefit from having a drainage hole poked on the side, about 1/4 the way up as well? Seems logical to me.

  3. #11
    VFT and Drosera lover vft guy in SJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (jimscott @ July 01 2005,1:17)]
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (vft guy in SJ @ July 01 2005,3:58)]I have found that Sars prefer to be top watered. I pour enough water into the pot so that when it drains out the water level is about 1/4 of the way up the side of the pot.
    Steve, I have mine in a mini-bog (a bucket). Would you say that a bucket, being a larger version of a pot, would also benefit from having a drainage hole poked on the side, about 1/4 the way up as well? Seems logical to me.
    Definately give it drainage holes.

    1/4 of the way up the side of the pot is my guideline, as a rule of thumb, you want the water tray to dry out within 1 day. If you have larger trays it may take less depth in the tray.
    There are only 2 infinite things... the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not too sure about the universe.

  4. #12
    chloroplast's Avatar
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    It may just be the algae, but it looks like your soil has the same consistency as potting soil! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img]

    I think the consensus is that what caused your plants death is root rot.

    How do you prevent root rot while keeping the plant constantly wet? Simple.... very well draining pot and potting mix. That means a lot of drainage holes at the bottom, and a loose soil like 1:1 peaterlite or sand. That way, you can keep the pot in a saucer of water, and not have to worry as much about root rot.

    The first few times I made my potting mixes, I thought to myself: "this doesn't have enough peat.....it's too loose." But then I remembered that roots don't grow IN soil, they grow AROUND the soil particles....so having a airy, light, loose, free draining soil is great for most plants.
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  5. #13

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    I would say some sort of firtilizer got into your peat. You might have also cooked the plant and allowed the roots to get too warm (or a combination of borth...)

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    So, the idea is to let your sarrs water trays dry out once in a while?

    I have been letting that happen because I figure in the wild..the bogs do occasianally dry up for a day or so. Aprilh.
    \"People place their hand on the Bible and swear to uphold the Constitution; they don't put their hand on the Constitution and swear to uphold the Bible,\" Jamie Raskin, to Senator Nancy Jacobs.

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    To me it appears your root system has failed. Root rot seems too obvious. Iíd be sort of interested to know where you had the pot? Your plant declined far too fast for my liking to have gone from photo 1 to the second photo where it was virtually dead in that span of time. Iím thinking root scorch with a secondary bacterial or fungal infection. Is that pot anywhere close to a wall that is radiating heat? Is it placed on asphalt? Just curious.

    I water all the Sarrs from the top. My drip trays are virtually dry to the bone at least twice a day. I water 3-4x a day in this heat as the plants are really sucking up the water. I have a few inches of sand in the bottom of most pots. I'm using a mix of sphagnum/sand at around 2/3 parts sphagnum to 1 part sand. This appears to be working for me. I use rain water, distilled water, and most recently began using RO/DI water due to all the water bans in the area.

    Some of my newly transplanted Sarrs are shocking and pitchers are burning because of the time of year I received them. I am trying to add a 1/4 cap full of SuperThrive per gallon to those plants. Because of the drought, I am getting leaf/pitcher burn. Not much you can do about that when the air is so dry from not having had more than a quarter inch of rain around my neck of the woods since May 12th. We've also had unseasonably warm weather here. When the day time temps are hovering around 90F each day, the plants tend to shut down to conserve energy which leaves them vulnerable to a host of diseases. I tinkered with the idea of misting mine in the early morning but figured that was a sure fire way to scorch them. I am now thinking that I want to try to raise the relative humidity around the plants by misting them at night to get through this heat. I may or may not do this.

    I am thinking you may have a combination of issues which culminated in the failure of your plantís root system.

  8. #16

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    I think that it may have been that the soil didn't drain enough. I had it in a pot that was sitting in a tray of water out on my deck. If you're also wondering about the temperature, it gets quite hot out there, and maybe the roots did warm up too fast.

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