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Thread: New sarracenia owner

  1. #9
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    Probably because you repotted your flava and put it in new conditions. It's also getting late in the season. That's the reason why I like flava hybrids more [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img].

  2. #10

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    Are the hybrids more acceptable to new growing conditions? Can I expect new growth for the next season? I'm not giving up on these dudes... they're too pretty. What do I do about dormancy? Questionsquestionsquestions.... [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img]

  3. #11

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    They look a bit like they've suffered some aphid damage - you've got some twisted pitchers there. Leave it as it is though and don't cut into green tissue. It looks like you can snip off the dead brown pitcher in the bottom right though.

    I'm afraid the only new growth you'll probably see now is non-trapping flat leaves used purely for photosynthesis. Flava is a spring grower and the older pitchers will slowly decay over the next few months.

    Your purpurea will carry on growing pitchers until it gets cold.

    Keep them the same way as your VFTs. Sarracenia require the same dormancy.

    All sarracenia cope fine with new conditions and being repotted - they're pretty tough. The advantage of hybrids is that with most of them you get pitcher growth non stop throughout the season. I would recommend you get a 'Judith Hindle' or something - they look their best in June - September at least.



    Alexis Vallance, U.K.
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  4. #12

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    Thanks for the helpful advice. I don't mind the wait for next season. I guess I just needed to know what to do with them now. It makes sense the Flava is late in season as I received it FULL to the gills with bugs. I assumed it was time for it to kick back and digest until it gets cold. Should I treat it in some way in case it is insect damage? I'll look into getting some different species that last a bit longer for the next growing season but It'll be nice to see what happens to this spring grower. Will it at least take root before dormancy? This site is incredible for assistance!

    Alvin - I just took peek at your grow list and photos... WOW! Any other recommendations for a robust seasonal growing Sarracenia? GORGEOUS VFTs!

  5. #13
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    Oh yea, and all the bugs will speed up pitcher decay, and can create "dead zones" along the pitcher. I wouldn't really worry about it unless it displays abnormal growth, exluding the flat non-carnivorous leaves that should soon pop up. Take care.

  6. #14

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    The addiction continues... [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img]

  7. #15
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    Hey, pm me and I can tell you how to obtain some good performers for the rest of the growing season, if you like.

  8. #16

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    The browning spots so low on the pitcher leaf looks like leaf burn. That usually happens with an over full, had to much to eat, pitcher. The leaf will die at that level and slowly spread around the leaf. Cut the dead and dying leaf and the new growth will eventually replace it. No thing. So many pitchers of mine are so full of insects that most of them have the insect caused "dead zone". The rhizomes are very healthy and happy in spite of the leaves problems.
    45 yrs. growin\'
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