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Thread: How do i put these babies to bed

  1. #17
    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

    See You Space Cowboy

    actagggcagtgatatcccattggtacatggcaaattagcctcatgat
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  2. #18
    herenorthere's Avatar
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    But that's too pessimistic about a Sarr's prospects outdoors in the north.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

  3. #19
    scottychaos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (herenorthere @ Sep. 07 2005,9:19)]But that's too pessimistic about a Sarr's prospects outdoors in the north.
    what is pessimistic about it?
    I dont think it is pessimistic, it is simply realistic.
    most Sarrs have little prospects outdoors all winter in the north. I have tried it several times..death is nearly certain.
    the fridge gives FAAAAAR better results.

    the only method that seems to work well for southern sarrs in the north is to have the plants *in the ground*, in a bog, because the ground provides much protection.
    and super-heavy mulch over the bog, like a 3-foot layer of oak leaves and pine needles.
    just pots, sitting outdoors anywhere north of say, Washington DC, is just asking for death..

    Scot

  4. #20

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    Mine go in the totally dark celler and are maintained as aquatics: pots totally submerged. Temps. are just above and just below freezing say 30-45F. Haven't lost a plant in 3 years. I do the Dionaea the same way. I lost more plants trying to keep the "just barely moist" dictate. My plants have been aquatic now for 3 years, and it sure saves me a lot of hassle with the watering schedule - there is none. No worries about mold either since it can't grow underwater. My advise is keep them wet, it works for me anyways.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  5. #21

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    Since the weather here is so unpredictable (on a climate line, on a river, at that one point where we get weather patterns crossing from both the Gulf and Canada) I'm thinking of dividing my babies. Hibernate half in the fridge, half outside. Insurance that some will make it, I hope. Don't have room for all in the fridge that need dormancy. We'll see how they do.

    At this point though, the days are getting shorter, but the temps outside are still near 90F. I'm just going to start shortening the timer on the lights inside until the temps drop enough to transfer half to the patio for a hopefully natural drop into dormancy without too much shock.

    Will this temporary lessening of light cause any problems for my non-dormancy CPs you think? I'm working on getting a second area set up for them eventually, but it'll be a few more months until I can manage it. For now I've just got the one set of lights for all of them.

  6. #22
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    The non-dormancy plants also need the lessening of photoperiod and presumably cooler temps. As someone put it, they slow down. Plants like the Neps and D. capensis, spatulata fall into that category.

  7. #23
    herenorthere's Avatar
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    Photoperiod doesn't vary much in the tropics, so photoperiod doesn't provide as strong a signal and means little or nothing to many tropical plants. And, if they do pay attention to it, it might be to signal something other than that it's spring and time to grow or that it's fall and time to shut down. That's temperate climate thinking.

    We have spring ephemerals in our forests that complete much of their growth cycle during the time they can get sun after temperatures have warmed but before forests leaf-out. I've heard their equivalents in subtropical deciduous forests are winter ephemerals, doing the same thing but during winter. So a decreasing photoperiod might be their signal to start a new season's growth. Plants that go dormant for a summer dry season can take an increasing photoperiod as a signal to go dormant. I don't grow any Drosera but don't some them do that?
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

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