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Thread: What kind of frog is this?

  1. #1
    Loves VFT's! Trapper7's Avatar
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    Question What kind of frog is this?

    I have these little guys all around my pond, but as soon as they get their feet and lose their tails, they hang out on my lawn. Are they frogs? Toads? I'm in Central Florida. I've looked on many websites that show different species of frogs in Central Florida, but I can't find these guys. My husband says they're called Rickets, but I did a search for them on Google and only Cricket Frogs come up.



    See how small they are and they stay this small



    Anyone know so I can look up some info on them. Would I be able to put them in with my Fire Bellied Toads?
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    spdskr's Avatar
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    Cricket Frog (Acris sp.) would be your best bet. They are the smallest type of tree frogs, have a warty appearing skin, and slight webbing between the rear toes only.

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    Loves VFT's! Trapper7's Avatar
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    These little guys don't have warty skin or webbing between the rear toes. Also no trianglular mark behind it's head/between the eyes.
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    spdskr's Avatar
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    Do you seem to have "hoards" of these little guys right now in your lawn? Proportionally (head size to body size) the could be a metamorphing Bufo sp (toad). They often exist in plague like numbers for a few weeks after leaving their birth pond.

    The body proportions may change as the amphibian mautures, so I wouldn't rule out an Acris species which as adults have much larger hind legs in proportion to the size on the head. I have never seen large numbers of juvenile cricket frogs, or any true frog species for that matter, however. (once again toads seem to be much more prolific).

    Are there pads under the tips of the toes? If not, then more evidence is pointing towards some type of Bufo sp. Hope this information helps. Looking at the skin texture, it has to be either Bufo or Acris.

    Lastly, while I'm certainly a novice in carnivorous plants, I actually have a couple of graduate level degrees in vertebrate zoology. Please let me know what you eventually ID these juveniles to be.

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    Loves VFT's! Trapper7's Avatar
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    Yes there are tons of these little guys all around right now and there are still a bunch in the pond which haven't gotten their legs yet. I just checked and no there are no pads under the tips of their toes. I'll look up toad species in Central Florida and see if I can find these guys. Thanks spdskr!
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    You could try looking up Eleutherodactylus planirostris. They are fairly common in Central Florida and have a similar coloration. I'm not saying that's what it is but its worth a try. Or it could just be some mutated amphibian only found north of Orlando that was created when radioactive debris from the space shuttle fell in your yard.

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    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    Given that they are newly morphed it is going to be a bit of a hard call as they do not have full colouration and morphology.

    I am inclined to agree with the assessment of cricket frogs though
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    Loves VFT's! Trapper7's Avatar
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    Thanks guys. I emailed pictures to someone off this Florida frog species site, so maybe he'll be able to tell me. I'll let you know when I hear back from him
    Great Googly Moogly!

    Beware of the yellow snow!

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