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Thread: Where's The Exit?

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Where's The Exit?














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    clippity-clip-clip Clue's Avatar
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    That last one looks like S. x excellens with a beetle...

    ...or is that just me?
    "I, for one, can't wait to grow Nepenthes extincta!"
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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    That's the same plant that some have called S. 'Ladies in Waiting'... the same plant sent to me as S. flava 'Coppertop'.

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    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    It is an x excellens. No chance that is 'Ladies in Waiting' or flava var. cuprea....
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

    See You Space Cowboy

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Travis, what kind of snake is that? Is that what they call a "garden snake"?

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    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    Looks like a Garter (Thamnophis). Not sure what subspecies...
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

    See You Space Cowboy

    actagggcagtgatatcccattggtacatggcaaattagcctcatgat
    Hagerstown, Maryland

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  7. #7
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Are garter and garden snake synonymous?

  8. #8
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    I just googled the genus name:

    Garter snake
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Jump to: navigation, search
    Garter snake

    Coast garter snake
    Thamnophis elegans terrestris
    Scientific classification
    Kingdom: Animalia
    Phylum: Chordata
    Class: Reptilia
    Order: Squamata
    Suborder: Serpentes
    Family: Colubridae
    Genus: Thamnophis
    Fitzinger, 1843
    Species

    See Taxonomy section.

    A garter snake is any species of North American snake within the genus Thamnophis. Because of the similarity in the sound of the words, combined with where people often see them, they are sometimes called garden snakes, gardner snakes or gardener snakes, or even garder snakes or guarder snakes. They are harmless to humans. Garter snakes are common across North America, from Canada to Central America, and they are the single most widely distributed genus of reptile in North America.

    Behavior
    A young Garter snake

    Garter snakes of all species are gregarious (when not in brumation or aestivation). They have complex systems of pheromonal communication. They can locate other snakes by following their pheromone-scented trails. Male and female skin pheromones are so different as to be immediately distinguishable. However, sometimes male garter snakes produce both male and female pheromones. During mating season, this fact fools other males into attempting to mate with these "she-males". She-males have been shown to garner more copulations than normal males in the mating balls that form at the den when females emerge into the mating melee.

    If disturbed, a garter snake may strike with bowling, and will often coil, but typically it will hide its head and flail its tail. These snakes will also discharge a malodorous, musky-scented secretion from the gland. They often use these techniques to escape when ensnared by a predator. They will also slither into the water to escape a predator on land. Hawks, crows, raccoons, crayfish and other snake species (such as the coral snake and king snake) will eat garter snakes, with even shrews and frogs eating the juveniles.

    Venom

    Garters were long thought to be nonvenomous, but recent discoveries have revealed that they do in fact produce a mild neurotoxic venom.[1] Garter snakes are nevertheless harmless to humans due to the very low amounts of venom they produce, which is comparatively mild, and the fact that they lack an effective means of delivering it. They do have enlarged teeth in the back of their mouth, but unlike many rear-fanged colubrid snakes, garter snakes do not have a groove running down the length of the teeth that would allow it to inject venom into its prey. The venom is delivered via a Duvernoy's gland, secreted between their lips and gums.[2][3] Whereas most venomous snakes have anterior or forward venom glands, the Duvernoy's gland of garters are posterior (to the rear) of the snake's eyes.[4] The mild poison is spread into wounds through a chewing action. The properties of the venom are not well known, but it appears to contain 3FTx, commonly known as three-finger toxin, which is a neurotoxin commonly found in the venom of colubrids and elapids. A bite may result in mild swelling and an itching sensation. There are no known cases of serious injury and extremely few with symptoms of envenomation.

    Here's one of the pictures on the site:



    Sure looks like what I have.

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