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Thread: Poison Dart Frogs!

  1. #11
    Cthulhu138's Avatar
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    At my departure from the hobby, R.benedicta hadn't been described yet and was still considered a form of R.fantastica (then, R.fantasticus). It's interesting that after all these years H.azureiventris females are still so scarce. At my time in the hobby there were only like 3 known to exist in collections in the U.S. and they were old and seldomly bred successfully. New imports were just starting to come in when I sold off the collection.

    To the best of my recollection, here's a rough list of what I kept and bred:

    Adelphobates :
    castaneonicus
    galactonotus - Moon Shine
    galactonotus - Red
    galactonotus - Yellow

    Amreega:
    trivittata - Red
    trivitatta - Yellow
    trivittata - Green

    Dendrobates :
    auratus - Reticulated
    auratus - Hawaiian
    auratus - Costa Rican
    auratus - Panama Blue
    auratus - Black
    auratus - Kuna Yala
    auratus - Camoflage
    auratus - Darien Gap
    auratus - Bocas Del Toro
    auratus - Forget the locale, it was a Mountain. Beautiful big metallic blue frogs.
    leucomelas - Standard
    leucomelas - Chocolate
    leucomelas - Albino
    tinctoruis - Formerly azureus
    tinctorius - Sipalawini Blue
    tinctorius - Sipalawini Green
    tinctorius - French Guyana
    tinctorius - Alanis
    tinctorius - Infer-Alanis
    tinctorius - Patricia
    tinctorius - Lorenzo
    tinctorius - Bakuis
    tinctorius - Surinam Cobalt
    tinctorius - Weygoldt
    tinctorius - Saul Yellow Back
    tinctorius - Giant Orange
    tinctorius - Regina
    tinctorius - Oyapoque
    tinctorius - Brazilian Yellow Head
    tinctorius - Citronella
    truncatus - Yellow
    truncatus - green

    Epipedobates:
    anthonyii
    tricolor

    Hyloaxlus :
    azureiventris - 2 Males

    Oophaga :
    arborea - Red
    histrionica
    pumilo - Cayo De agua
    pumilio - Bastimentos - Several varieties
    pumilio - Mann Creek/Alimirante
    pumilio - Bocas Del Toro
    pumilio - Darkland
    pumilio - Colon
    pumilio - San Cristobal
    pumilio - Bri Bri
    pumilio - Pope Island
    pumilio - Escudo de Veraguas
    pumilio - Rio Branco
    sylvatica


    Phyllobates :
    bicolor
    lugubris
    terribilis - Mint Green
    terribilis - Yellow
    terribilis - Orange
    vitattus

    Ranitomeya :
    amazonica - 2 Different lines
    fantastica - Standard
    fantastica - Yellow ( which were ironically red)
    imitator - Standard
    imitator - Tarapoto
    imitator - Intermedius
    imitator - Varadero
    lamasi - Standard
    lamasi - Panguana
    lamasi - Red/Orange
    reticulata
    ventrimaculatus - Yellow
    ventrimaculatus - Red - Todd Kelly Line
    ventrimaculatus - Red - German Line

    I know I'm forgetting some, especially auratus, tinctorius, ventrimaculatus and pumilio.

  2. #12

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    Wow! That's a really impressive list. I'd love to have the opportunity to work with some of those, especially some of the obligates and standard lamasi (now sirensis) Do you remember which histrionicus and sylvatica you had? I have a single sub-adult red head. Very cool frog but I only see it about once a month, unfortunately. The auratus mountain locale you mentioned may have been El Cope. That's what I have pictured, and I know they come from higher elevations in Panama.

    I think more H. azureiventris came in with Sean Stewart's INIBICO import. I got mine from someone selling their collection, but I think they're originally from that import. It's believed that high temperatures when raising tads leads to male heavy clutches. I'm raising all of my current tads in a poorly insulated room, so it stays in the 60s usually. Hopefully, that I can raise up some females.

    Were you ever a member of Dendroboard? Thanks for the list, and feel free to add your pictures here if you would like!

  3. #13
    Cthulhu138's Avatar
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    Neither the histrionicus or the sylvaticus had locale data on them. The histrionicus were blue and a smokey silvery blackish brown and the sylvaticus were yellow and dark brown. The auratus weren't the El Cope. They were huge for an auratus, tinctorius sized frogs. Their pattern looked like the small reticulated variety only metallic sea green/blue instead of green.

    I definitely witnessed temperature dependant sexing going on with my Phyllobates and Epipedobates froglets. It makes sense that H.azureiventris would be the same way given how closely they are related. When I got my H.azureiventris it was still classified as an Epipedobates. Sean's INIBICO imports rings a distinct bell. All of that was just starting when I bailed on the hobby.

    I was a member of Dendroboard but, wasn't very active on there. I would sell my surplus froglets on there once in a while. Especially the thumbnail species and pricier tinctorius and obligate egg feeders that my wholesale customers wouldn't touch.

    Here's a few pics that somehow survived through the years :

    Dendrobates leucomelas


    Ranitomeya sirensis (Formerly Standard lamasi)


    Oophaga pumilio - Cayo de Agua


    Oophaga pumilio - Colon


    Oophaga pumilio - Bri Bri

  4. #14
    Cthulhu138's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by swords View Post
    Excellent! I've always wanted to do PDFs but been worried about the 80*F "heat limit". Most of my terrariums get higher than that if i don't have cool air pumped into em.
    Don't believe everything you read on these guys Josh. Mine were in the 90's and above for most of July and August every year. Some became inactive during this time and would hide in crevices and burrows at the bottom of the terrariums and others slowed their breeding down a bit but, I've never lost a frog due to the high summer temps.

  5. #15
    kulamauiman's Avatar
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    I though the heat was beneficial to treating chtridiomycosis?

  6. #16
    amphirion's Avatar
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    they also recently discovered crayfish/crustaceans as a potential vector for chytrid and allows it to persist long after amphibians have been wiped out.
    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...yfish-science/
    " You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means." -Inigo Montoya
    +growlist
    +petiolaris drosera going dormant?
    +picture thread

  7. #17
    RL7836's Avatar
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    Noob alert - would any of the higher-elevation species do well in a HL greenhouse (like in Paul's - Whimgrinder)?
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

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  8. #18
    Cthulhu138's Avatar
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    I know for s fact that Epipedobates tricolor do very well in greenhouses as I'm sure many more do as well. Especially the smaller "thumbnail" species.

  9. #19

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    The histrionicus you describe sound interesting. The big Oophaga are pretty rare these days, so hearing accounts of them being kept are always interesting to me. Did they ever breed for you? I've never seen an auratus like you describe, probably one of the many lost to popularity swings. There aren't many keeping the less common auratus now, even the Costa Rican greens aren't offered for sale much. Thanks for the pictures!

    The 80F heat ceiling has a lot to do with people keeping totally sealed enclosures. They often experience 90+F in nature, but they take advantage of evaporative cooling and find cooler niches within their habitat. Mine survived the high temps I think because all of my tanks are vented to fresh air. I think chytrid is killed above 85F or something close to that, but I've never heard or read of chytrid as a proven reason a collection was lost. New imports sometimes test positive for it, but they are treated with antifungals while in quarantine. The crawfish as a vector is still being debated, but many amphibians are unaffected by the fungus but serve as vectors to keep it going during dry seasons or after it wipes out a specific population...red eye tree frogs, green tree frogs, and I think even bull frogs can be vectors.

    As long as the greenhouse was escape proof and the frogs had access to sufficient food, I think they'd do great in one. Species like tricolor, the highland morph of anthonyi, H. azureiventris, and many of the riverine Ameerega come to mind as candidates. The Atlanta Botanic Gardens has E. tricolor free roaming in their cloudforest exhibit.

  10. #20
    carnivorous plants of the world -- unite! DragonsEye's Avatar
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    Cute lil devils. I've always liked them but have never tried them -- bit beyond my finances and I'm already way short on space as it.




    "Blessed are the cracked….
    For they are the ones who let in the light."



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