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Thread: Reptiles of UNC

  1. #25
    hcarlton's Avatar
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    So I realized I never posted the pics of the lizard lab not too long ago; made a few new friends:
    Rhacodactylus auriculatus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    I want to apologize now for any odd facial expressions, I am not good at smiling on camera....
    Me nad the Gargoyle by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Me and the Gargoyle by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Hemidactylus frenatus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Hemidactylus frenatus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Heloderma suspectum by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Heloderma suspectum by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    The Gargoyles and this species are owned by a fellow classmate, among several dozen (I estimate) other reptiles....
    Gehyra marginata by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    While the little one was friendly, this guy was not...
    Gehyra marginata by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Yes, the monitor is a little overweight. He loves hardboiled eggs...
    Kronos, Varanus exanthematicus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    He spent lab wandering the floor, and getting attention...
    Kronos, Varanus exanthematicus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    This guy also hung out on several shoulders
    Pogona vitticeps by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Pogona vitticeps by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Me and the beardie by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Beardie and a friend by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Tilique scincoides by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Me and the blue tongue by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Me and the blue tongue by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Tiliqua scincoides by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Check out the pattern. I want one so bad...
    Tiliqua scincoides by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Lastly, another non-handleable...
    Emoia isolata by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Emoia isolata by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
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  2. #26
    hcarlton's Avatar
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    So, this is not reptile-related, but I'm not starting an entire thread: had a peregrine falcon just about buzz my head out on the deck as he chased some doves, got some pics when he landed on the neighbor's house...
    Peregrine falcon by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Peregrine falcon by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr


    Now, on to more reptiles: Snake Lab from two weeks ago
    This is Mocha, a Dumeril's boa
    Acrantophis dumerili by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Friendly, but perhaps a bit "clingy"
    Acrantophis dumerili by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Python regius by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Beautiful, but not friendly unfortunately...
    Epicrates cenchria cenchria by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Epicrates cenchria cenchria by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Spent about 45 minutes watching a documentary with this girl in my lap
    Python bivitattus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Not a snake, but a great example of the lizard mimics
    Ophisaurus ventralis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Sadly the glass lizard had a tumor on its eye
    Ophisaurus ventralis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Ophisaurus ventralis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Another beautiful but iffy-attitude animal
    Python curtus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    This one was also iffy about everyone except her owner (and even then somewhat; she smelled up the room in response to being put away), but absolutely beautiful
    Goldenchild retic by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Goldenchild retic by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Goldenchild retic by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Goldenchild retic by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    This guy was also a stinker, but more handle-able
    Diadophis punctatus regalis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Lampropeltis getula floridana by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    NOT handle-able, but still beautiful
    Crotalus oreganus concolor by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Sistrurus catenatus edwardsii by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Agkistrodon contorrix pictigaster by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Crotalus viridis viridis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Boiga irregularis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr

    Lastly, best experience of the lab: this is a probably 8 foot lavender (or perhaps purple phase) amelanistic reticulated python. Supposedly he can be cranky, and bit someone not three days before, but I held him for a half hour without issue (unless you count him using my head as a lookout point an issue)
    Lavender amel retic by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Me and the lavender amel retic by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Me and the lavender amel retic by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Me and the lavender amel retic by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    This size, and he's only a yearling...
    Me and the lavender amel retic by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
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  3. #27
    hcarlton's Avatar
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    For one of the herp labs, we partook in venom analysis. Incuded was the actual process of extracting venom from several animals, like this beauty
    Crotalus cerberus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Several of the students actually were the ones to extract the venom
    Sistrurus catenatus edwardsii extraction by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Crotalus scutelatus scutelatus extraction by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Look closely in the two pics above, you can see the venom in the extraction tubes....

    We also managed to extract from the Gila monster, which took a while as she's not inclined to bite...but when she did it was hard enough to leave imprints in the plastic covering on the rod...
    Heloderma suspectum by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Heloderma suspectum by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Milking Heloderma by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Milking Heloderma by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Milking Heloderma by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Can you see the venom?
    Heloderma venom by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Milking Heloderma by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    She also left a souvenir:
    Gila tooth by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr

    However, the highlight for me was that I extracted venom from this specimen. Yielded over 200 microliters of venom, enough to put you into serious trouble...
    Crotalus molossus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Crotalus molossus extraction by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Crotalus molossus extraction by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Crotalus molossus extraction by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Crotalus molossus extraction by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr

    This is in some ways a very nerve-wracking experience; the fangs are within inches of my hand, I know what these guys are capable of, and I couldn't stop shaking (both nerves and excitement). However, after this I have decided: next chance I get, I definitely intend to get some practice with catching more than just the nonvenomous reptiles I come across
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
    Growlist

  4. #28
    hcarlton's Avatar
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    Volunteer work has begun again, and with it come pics
    Lampropeltis pyromelana pyromelana 1 by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Lampropeltis pyromelana pyromelana 1 by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Lampropeltis pyromelana pyromelana 2 by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Lampropeltis alterna by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    The female boomslang watching the proceedings as always
    Dispholidus typus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Dispholidus typus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Ahaetulla praesina by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Oxybelis fulgidus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Pantherophis spiloides by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    This guy decided he was now arboreal
    Agkistrodon contortrix pictigaster by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Philodryas baroni by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Crotalus oreganus concolor by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    And the turd being a turd, as always....
    Varanus indicus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Babies! Lots and lots of little rattlers in the room now
    Crotalus scutulatus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Crotalus tigris by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
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  5. #29
    Greetings from the netherworld. curtisconners's Avatar
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    So many amazing snakes! In your experience, are boomslangs usually as curious as the one there? If you've worked with other boomslangs of course.
    The profile pic that you see above is my actual photo. I am a hyper-intelligent snake that has learned to use the internet and I will eventually rule you all.

    Just kidding..... Or am I?

  6. #30
    Lotsa blue bluemax's Avatar
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    I realize that I was behind on this thread. Very nice animals and photos of them. I especially love the Gila monster. And now I know what you look like, HC.
    - Mark

  7. #31
    hcarlton's Avatar
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    To curtisconnors: This female is curious, but the male is a shy one; being also that this is the only reptile room I've worked in thus far they are the only boomslangs I've had any experience with (and technically, no experience since they stay in their cages; ONLY the professor is allowed to deal with them as they are not safe animals).
    To bluemax: the Gila is also a pretty docile animal (as most of the species are, actually), but of course she doesn't come out of the tank often . And yes, a rare picture of me; there are a few others floating around (some recent ones on the Sarracenia forum because I got the new T shirt!), but I tend not to end up in photos often, a trait I share with my father.

    Oh, additional news: the milk snakes are back home, so there will probably be more pics of them soon! And if I manage to successfully breed the female with my male corn, pics eventually of some really cool babies...
    Last edited by hcarlton; 05-18-2016 at 05:47 PM.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
    Growlist

  8. #32
    hcarlton's Avatar
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    More shots from today:
    Crotalus atrox by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Speckleds are amazing, since every one is a different color
    Crotalus mitchellii pyrrhus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Crotalus mitchellii pyrrhus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    And hognoses are cute
    Heterodon nasicus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Crotalus willardi willardi by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    There are hybridization attempts in the making to study effects on venom composition
    Crotalus viridis, C. scutelatus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Oxybelis aeneus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    This guy is always active, and very inquisitive
    Hydrodynastes gigas by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Hydrodynastes gigas by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    This speckled actually looks slate blue
    Crotalus mitchellii pyrrhus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    In addition to the garters, you can see a bull snake sticking his nose out of the hide
    Thamnophis elegans vagrans by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Check out the rattle....
    Sistrurus catenatus edwardsii by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Agkistrodon contortrix pictigaster by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Bothriopsis bilineatus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Posted a shot of a straw colored midget faded last time, here's a far more starkly patterened one (and he and what I assume is his sibling were both very curious about goings-on)
    Crotalus oreganus concolor by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    And then there is this hungry fellow
    Lampropeltis getula californiae by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Lampropeltis getula californiae by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Heloderma suspectum by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Crotalus viridis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
    Growlist

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