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Thread: Reptiles of UNC

  1. #1
    hcarlton's Avatar
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    Reptiles of UNC

    Started just recently helping take care of animals at the university I'm studying at. I'm not at the stage where I can help handle the venomous ones, but I'm still in the room, so got some pics of some interesting animals:
    Spotted Night snake-Hypsiglena torquata by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Spotted Night snake-Hypsiglena torquata by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Heterodon nasicus nasicus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Mojave x Prairie Rattlesnake-Crotalus scutulatus x v. viridis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    These guys are glossy black, and look a lot like indigo snakes. Just more dangerous....
    Mussurana-Clelia ssp. by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    This guy was grumping about my presence the whole time we were there
    Prairie Rattlesnake-Crotalus viridis viridis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Sonoran Lyre snake-Trimorphodon bisctatus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Mojave rattlesnake-Crotalus scutulatus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Southwestern speckled rattlesnake-Crotalus mitchellii pyrrhus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Big Bend/Trans pecos copperhead-Agkistrodon contortrix pictigaster by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Tiger rattelsnake-Crotalus tigris by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Asian vine snake-Ahaetulla ssp. by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Banded Rock rattlesnake-Crotalus lepidus klauberi by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    The Cal king was at least 5 feet long, weighed a couple pounds. Luckily, also a rather calm animal
    California kingsnake-Lampropeltis getula californiae by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    By contrast, this Florida king had an attitude, and is apparently well known for it
    Florida kingsnake-Lampropeltis getula floridana by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    The Sonoran was another calm one
    Sonoran Desert kingsnake-Lampropeltis getula splendida by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    False Water Cobra-Hydrodynastes gigas by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    The boomslang was quite curious, watching us through the front of his cage. This thing is jet black
    Boomslang-Dispholidus typus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Southwestern speckled rattlesnake-Crotalus mitchellii pyrrhus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    The jumping viper did not demonstrate how they get their name, luckily, so I got an okay pic. This snake has extremely keeled scales, so much so they notably stick out from the skin
    Jumping Viper-Atropoides nummifer by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Had to take this one through the plastic viewing window, as this was one snake we did not deal with. The Neotropicals probably exceeded 5 feet, and were thicker than my arm
    Yucatan Neotropical rattlesnake-Crotalus simus tzabcan by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Argentine racer-Philodryas baroni by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Desert massasauga-Sistrurus catenatus edwardsii by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    The Gila was a lazy one. Flicked her tongue a couple times but otherwise was content to lay in this awkward position...
    Gila monster-Heloderma suspectum by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Amazonian palm viper-Bothriopsis bilineata by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
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    Chief Cat Behavior Specialist Knuckles's Avatar
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    Sounds fun! Iv'e kept a Mojave, southern pacific rattler, & a copperhead. They were actually pretty mild mannered but the most vicious snake Ive ever dealt with was a yellow belly water snake. These guys are huge & mean!
    I once had it in a 40gal tank in my office at the school I worked for.....bad idea..... It tore through the LOCKED sliding screen top one night & I had an extremely stressful week trying to locate it in every classroom on that floor. I put towels under every doorway & warned teachers. Lol they hated me that week. I finally found it behind some pots & under my office plant light & then just told all the teachers it was a joke

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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    Attitude depends on the animal really. Some of the prairie rattlers barely made any issue of being moved around. Then there was the one mentioned above....
    For the most part the venomous animals are pretty calm. Snakes like the red-tailed ratsnake or the brown tree snakes, which are less toxic, are the ones with the bad attitudes.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
    Growlist

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    carnivorous plants of the world -- unite! DragonsEye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hcarlton View Post
    Attitude depends on the animal really. Some of the prairie rattlers barely made any issue of being moved around. Then there was the one mentioned above....
    For the most part the venomous animals are pretty calm. Snakes like the red-tailed ratsnake or the brown tree snakes, which are less toxic, are the ones with the bad attitudes.
    Age matters as well, from what I understand. Babies or very young snakes are generally more likely to bite than an adult. Does make sense if true.

    Quote Originally Posted by hcarlton View Post
    The Gila was a lazy one.
    Quite typical, I hear.
    "Blessed are the cracked….
    For they are the ones who let in the light."



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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    Well, depends on both. Young snakes are more flighty, smaller species can be the same, but can be conditioned out of it.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
    Growlist

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    Cthulhu138's Avatar
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    Never seen a pure black D.typus before. It's Nose looks very blunt for a Boomslang. Is it a subspecies ?

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    BS Bulldozer SubRosa's Avatar
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    Handling venomous snakes safely is a matter of developing a condition of trust between you and the animals. You need to trust that they'll sink their fangs in any chance you give them.
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
    Just know when to keep the verdict to yourself.

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    BS Bulldozer SubRosa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cthulhu138 View Post
    Never seen a pure black D.typus before. It's Nose looks very blunt for a Boomslang. Is it a subspecies ?
    That is a very strange looking Boomslang. They can be pretty schizy, maybe the nose was damaged?
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
    Just know when to keep the verdict to yourself.

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