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Thread: Dart frog decisions

  1. #17

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    You've got a LOT of searching to do, Spect! There are so many different ways to setup and run a viv...and just as many people who will say that is the "best" way. Half the battle is knowing what species you want to keep, and then building the viv around their requirements. You've picked auratus, which I believe are pretty terrestrial, so you'll want to go with something that has really good length and/or surface area to give them maximum territory and movement.

    Here is a German link (via Google translation) that has some good information...even monthly rainfall: http://translate.google.com/transla....&u=http

    They do their hunting on the ground, but still love to climb and tend to sleep in the upper areas of the tank, so you are looking for a viv that has the best of both worlds. A standard larger size aquarium would work well...you could probably do a 55 gal tank, but I think a 75 or 90 gal would be best in providing more surface area and a bit more height. A 40 gal breeder might even work depending on your space and budget. They are much more active with high humidity, so I would look into rigging up a mister via DIY humidifier for cheap, like this one: http://www.frognet.org/gallery/JasonW-humidifier-setup

    Then there comes the entire design of the viv, and this really comes down to personal preference. I would just spend time doing some research on different peoples' sites and seeing what appeals to you. There is the popular false bottom design, or just gravel, or using LECA (little water absorbing clay spheres) with maybe a pipe used for siphoning water, or just a layer of peat moss and leaves where you can just scoop it out when it gets nasty and replace it with fresh. I think it really comes down to what you're looking to do as far as maintenance and certain aspects of the viv. If you want a water feature, false bottom is nice. If it's pretty terrestrial, just a basic peat bottom may work best. You may be thinking something like this with a lot of plants: http://www.poison-frogs.nl/e03.html (scroll downt the page for his first viv) or something more simple like this: http://www.frognet.org/gallery/Dilshad-Khan-90G (personally, one of my favorites for terrestrial species).

    As far as plants, I would suggest trying out plants from a local Home Depot, Lowes, or garden center. Pothos are pretty popular, but again it will take some reading around on various sights and seeing what people are keeping and what they've had success with. Some may like more stagnant, humid air...but some may need some circulation to keep from molding away. A lot of it is trial and error. It might help to chech out some viv suppliers and often they will have little descriptions and requirements of plants (www.fantasticfrogs.com www.***********.com).

    As you narrow down what you want, it can be much easier to help out with specifics. But others can throw in their experiences and what has worked for them or what hasn't. Hope this helps you out a little.

  2. #18

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    Well, I'm going to have to disagree with skylsdale choice of plant shops. You are better off starting with the correct plants from someplace that knows what you need. Drop me an email spec and i'll reply with a couple of links that should help you out. A plant order will most likely cost you less then a CP order but in the end the total cost for the vivarium is more than the frogs. You should do a lot of reading before you begin buying things, it will save you a lot of trouble. Feel free to ask plenty of questions.

    Joe
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  3. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Well, I'm going to have to disagree with skylsdale choice of plant shops. You are better off starting with the correct plants from someplace that knows what you need.
    I can see your objection to places like Lowes (I wouldn't buy from there, either, unless there was a specific plant that would work well in the tank I was building; special ordering pothos is a waste of money when you can pretty much get it at any grocery or home improvement store). Maybe you missed my suggestion to:

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ] chech out some viv suppliers and often they will have little descriptions and requirements of plants (www.fantasticfrogs.com www.***********.com).
    Personally, I think it all comes down to what you're trying to achieve. If you want to go with something arboreal then you're probably looking for epyphitic plants, etc. that do well in a highly humid environment...and available from online vendors. But if you're going to be putting together something mostly terrestrial for tricolors or leucs, it's kind of a waste to order a bunch of ferns and ground plants that you can get at almost any local nursery or garden center.

  4. #20

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    Also Spec, you can usually collect ferns and mosses from your local area. That's what I did and the mosses I found were much cooler than the stuff off of the net.


    Mike [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

    P.S. Pothos, in general, isn't the best plant for a small terarium (20 gal. or less). It's a fast growing plant with a large root system and it can take over a tank if not pruned back periodically. However, it does make a good candidate if you have several tanks because it is very cheap, readily available, and covers alot of space. It also acts like a sponge to absorb excess nutrients (nitrogen) which would normally build up to unhealthy levels. So if you just want something to fill a gap or you have multiple tanks and you want to save $$$, Pothos can be good.

  5. #21

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    Sorry skylsdale, I did miss that part. My issue is that places like home depot are only going to have one or two common plants such as the pothos that you can use in the tank. However if you order from some of the smaller vivarium plant suppliers you can pick up really nice broms for $4 each and earth stars for $2 each. Along with other really nice plants for great prices. Of course these are somewhat smaller than the large plants at home depot and some are even cuttings but you will get a great variety of plants for a great price.

    joe
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  6. #22

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    if you have many tanks, you should try pothos, I love pothos, so easy to use and take care of. But for display cases, I do not use pothos due to their incredible growth.

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