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Thread: Leo still not eating.

  1. #1

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    Can any one help me with this one?

    I have a female leopard gecko that had a partial obstruction which has now passed. She was also treated for parasites at the same time. She still refuses to eat much and is begining to lose weight fast. I have no idea why she will not eat. Her temps are fine (82-85 in the warm end) and she plenty of water. She is on a substrate that there is no way she could possibly ingest. I am completely clueless as to why she will not eat. Any suggestions out there? Hopefully you guys are more usefull than the people at kingsnake.com (whom i have some choice words to describe) who would rather yell at me for using calci-sand than help me.

    Any help or ideas would be great,
    Thanks
    Ktulu
    "We're terrible animals. I think that the Earth's immune system is trying to get rid of us, as well it should." - Kurt Vonnegut

  2. #2

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    I'm no expert, but I'm curious. How long have you had her? Do you know her approximate age? Have you made changes to her diet/enviorment? Is she getting the proper photoperiod? When was the last time she shed? Does she get gut-loaded live food? Is she active or does she spend all her time in a hiding place? Does her skin look normal or does it seem dark &/or dull?
    Obviously there are waaaay to many reasons why she may not be eating, most have to do with stress &/or illness, enviromental factors or just normal seasonal anorexia.
    I read your previous post about her impaction, so naturally she's been under stress and may just need time to recup. I also read where she had a "sore" or something on her mouth. The mouth sore could be stomatitis and could be serious, so keep an eye on it. Symptoms of stomatitis, besides mouth lesions, can be lack of appetite, eye infections, loose teeth, tiny bruises.
    I remember running across a website once that might be helpful to you. It was Dr. Gecko, but I don't recall the exact URL.
    Hope you can figure something out...I'd hate to hear she couldn't be helped.
    (and sorry for all the questions! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img] )

  3. #3

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    First thank you for replying,

    i have had her for a little over 2 years, and thats about how old she is too. the only change in enviroment would be the removal of the calic-sand but i think she would have adjusted by now its been about a month. she was getting gut loaded mealworms and silkworms as a treat, they are both still available but she eats neither. He activity level is around normal though it has declined since the impaction, but she is more active now than she was when she had the impaction, but still less active than normal if that all makes sense. she has been sheding on her normal ~4week basis and her skin seems to have close to normal color much brighter than it was when she had the impaction. The sore in her mouth has been healed for about 2 weeks now with no signs of it anymore. Its not stomatitis as my vet comfirmed that it was not and she does have any of those other symptoms but lack of appetite. i looked at Dr. Gecko before and its a good site for genral problems but did really offer any help that i have not already gotten from my vet. im thinking i may want to bring her back yet again to the vet but i would hate to stress her more for no reason. I guess i can wait as i am supposed to call the vet later this week with her weight and i can see what he thinks the next best course of action should be.

    Thanks,
    Ktulu
    "We're terrible animals. I think that the Earth's immune system is trying to get rid of us, as well it should." - Kurt Vonnegut

  4. #4

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    Well, darn! Sounds baffling. Obviously you've had her long enough to know her very well (and good that you got rid of cali-sand!) and aside from the lack of appetite she sounds fairly healthy. Maybe you could offer a different food..crickets, fruit, greens?
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]He activity level is around normal though it has declined since the impaction, but she is more active now than she was when she had the impaction, but still less active than normal if that all makes sense.
    grinning....yes, that actually makes perfect sense!

    Glad to hear the vet confirmed no stomatitis. I, too, would hold off on stressing her out further by another trip to the vet, but certainly talk to your vet. I wish I could offer even a shred of help, but it sounds like you're doing all you can. I know it's so frustrating when you want to help an ailing animal and just nothing seems to work. Keep us posted on her progress, my fingers are crossed! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (LunaC @ April 20 2005,9:12)]Well, darn! Sounds baffling. Obviously you've had her long enough to know her very well (and good that you got rid of cali-sand!) and aside from the lack of appetite she sounds fairly healthy. Maybe you could offer a different food..crickets, fruit, greens?
    yeah i know she seems healthy but she is losingweight. right now she still has enough fat on her tail im not overly concerned but before too long she will be getting quite skinny
    i have tried feeding her every insect i have available to me so far i have tried crickets, butterworms, silkworms, waxworms, and mealworms all to no avail. As for fruit or other plants leopard geckos are insectavours and do not eat plant materials.
    "We're terrible animals. I think that the Earth's immune system is trying to get rid of us, as well it should." - Kurt Vonnegut

  6. #6

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    try forcefeeding. Blend a cricket "paste" and add some electrolyte supplement. Put a dab on her nose. Geckos hate to be dirty and will usually lick this nutritious cocktail right up!

  7. #7
    I've got a magic window! elgecko's Avatar
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    Let me ask a few questions.
    Is her tail straight and have no kinks in it?
    All the toes are straight with no kinks?
    It is able to hold its weight off the ground with it's legs, or when it moves does it slide it's belly on the ground?


    My Grow List Updated 8/24/17

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (SunPitcher @ April 21 2005,4:16)]try forcefeeding. Blend a cricket "paste" and add some electrolyte supplement. Put a dab on her nose. Geckos hate to be dirty and will usually lick this nutritious cocktail right up!
    i would prefer to aviod the stress of force feeding until she gets thin enough that it is necessary, she still has some time before i would consider that, i have tried hand feeding her which she just turns away from, so right now i just leave food available for her and hope she takes some.
    "We're terrible animals. I think that the Earth's immune system is trying to get rid of us, as well it should." - Kurt Vonnegut

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