User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Caulerpa

  1. #1
    7santiago's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    MIT, Cambridge, MA
    Posts
    451
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    doea any fish eat caulerpa, the schools 150 gallon tank know has caulerpa, its covered the tank completely and we now need to eliminate without moving the live coral, the salution is fish, but what fish has a fancy for caulerpa? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_h_32.gif[/img]
    Mens Et Manus

  2. #2
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would think that fish like Tangs would eat caulerpa, since they like to eat Romaine lettuce.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Piedmont, SC
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    well, even if you get a tang (if it does eat caulerpa), the problem that made the caulerpa grow is still their, which means that a worse algae (or bacteria) may take its place!
    You should probably address this issue, and if you do (properly) then the caulerpa should begin to die off...

    HTH

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    375
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    7,

    What is the issue with the tank being full of Caulerpa? Aesthetic? Overgrowing other inhabitants? Yellowing water?

    Finding a fish that will eat Caulerpa is a bit hit and miss.

    There are some species of Tang and Rabbit Fish that have the odd individual who will eat it, but there is no rule to that any one species will always go it. I had a pair a Blue Tangs that like it but my Sailfin Tang would not touch the stuff.

    You should also consider that Caulerpa is toxic to fish if enough is consumed. However, I will admit to never having heard of a fish ‘knowingly’ dying from it.

    CEL's point is somewhat relative. If you have an excess nutrient issue, removal of all of the Caulerpa may result in another form of algae taking its place. However, Caulerpa will grow quite well in low nutrient water. So its presence does not necessarily indicate that you have a high nutrient issue.

    As is always the case with marine aquariums, there is no set rule, and every system will respond differently to changes.

    Just as a side point…. Here in the State of Victoria Australia, Caulerpa taxifolia have been listed as a noxious weed. As of early this year it is illegal to sell or even have it in your aquarium.

    AJ

  5. #5
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Metro Atlanta Area
    Posts
    9,681
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    hey, can't people eat it? i tried some of mine and it wasn't that bad. kind of meaty.

    not suggesting you to eat it, just a sidenote lol.

    everyone needs a tang, anyway!

  6. #6
    7santiago's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    MIT, Cambridge, MA
    Posts
    451
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Our school put some salty fishies but they died of toxication.... [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img]
    Mens Et Manus

  7. #7
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    San Antonio, Texas; USA
    Posts
    2,363
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    well this is way late of course...

    But Cualerpa is nasty stuff.

    1) it can go sexual (which means it dissolves into a bunch of reproductive cells) when this happens you can kiss everything in the tank good bye.

    2) it is noxious

    How do you control it?

    Get in there, rip as much of it out as you can. every last shred you can get your fingers on.

    Do a massive water change.

    Biological control of Caulerpa is almost impossibe - if there is something else palatable for a grazer, its gonna go for it.

    you may have luck with Elysia subornata, a sea slug that eats caulerpa if you can find it, but I find that doubtful.

    The only way I have ever heard of it being eliminated from a tank is the old fashion way.

    pull your rocks, remove your coral put in a holding tank. Manually remove all the cualerpa, brush your rocks with a stiff bristle rock.

    If you have a sand substrate, bye bye, replace it it only takes a shred of this stuff to restart.

    Rebuild the tank, and keep your nutrient levels nearly non existent to keep it from gaining a foothold again.

    Your other option is to remove everything you want to live, and deny the tank light for a week or 2 until everything becomes a noxious soup. drain it, re-cure your rock, and start over.
    \"Maybe in order to understand mankind, we have to look at the word itself: \"Mankind\". Basically, it\'s made up of two separate words - \"mank\" and \"ind\". What do these words mean ? It\'s a mystery, and that\'s why so is mankind.\" ~ Jack Handey

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •