User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 39

Thread: Help with "FOWLR" tank

  1. #1
    Eats genetically engineered tomatoes Sig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Michigan -- If you donít like the weather, blink!
    Posts
    900
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Help with "FOWLR" tank

    Hey everyone, so our first project in Zoology is to design, make, and upkeep a randomly assigned aquarium biome. Our group was assigned "fish only with live rock", and until a few minutes ago I had no idea what that even was. I've been doing some research, but have no experience whatsoever in keeping fish, and thought it might be a good idea to ask for some help.

    This is currently just in the design phase, but if anyone has made this tank before and know easy fish/general tips you'd want to suggest, that would really be helpful.

    Thanks!
    Formerly known as Silenceisgod!

  2. #2
    Physalaemus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SF Bay Area, USA
    Posts
    217
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hey Silence!

    Great stuff there. I have a soft spot for FOWLR tanks. I was in the reef hobby for most of my highschool and college years, but made the switch to FOWLR in grad school as they are much, much easier to move.

    A few things to consider:
    Why live rock? This the thing that distinguishes FOWLR tanks from the typical marine aquarium. Large formations of live rock do multiple things: live rock has a ridiculous amount of surface area due to its porous nature: nitrifying bacteria grow on every surface of a tank and are responsible for converting fish waste into less toxic compounds. The rock itself supports incredibly high populations of bacteria, making the rock a giant living filter. The rock also serves as a network of visual barriers, creating territories for aggressive fish and lowering fighting.Lastly, the rock serves as a nursery of sorts for food organisms, seeding the tank with tiny isopods and amphipods.

    Tips:
    Stock light, stock small fish. Even with the addition of live rock, saltwater fish are sensitive to nitrogenous waste. Large fish produce more waste for their body size than small fish. Large fish also tend to make a tank seem crowded and less of an ecosystem.

    Use the reef mentality - all fish have a purpose. Lots of fish help keep the tank looking clean. Choose fish that serve functions: lawnmower blennies (eat hair algae), sailfin tangs(eat macro algaes), sand sifting gobies (keep substrate clean), cooperband butterflies (eat nuisance organisms like aptasia), neon gobies (eat parasite off other fish), etc.

    Lastly, from a teacher standpoint, consider having a message or theme. For instance, look up the Berlin Method. Low stocking, light feeding, no filter... say what? Live rock handles all the biological work. Because you won't be growing corals, protein skimming isn't that big a deal. Without a filter, you save on electricity... you have a "green" tank :P combine this with farmed or tank bred fish and sustainably harvested fish food stuffs... I smell an A

    Lol keep us posted and chime in with questions. I know a few of us were fish kids and still are at heart.

  3. #3
    i dont do pots. amphirion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    SF Bay Area, US
    Posts
    3,498
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    ^ couldnt have said it any better myself.
    " You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means." -Inigo Montoya
    +growlist
    +petiolaris drosera going dormant?
    +picture thread

  4. #4
    Eats genetically engineered tomatoes Sig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Michigan -- If you donít like the weather, blink!
    Posts
    900
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    @Physalaemus, Thanks a bunch for the tips! We haven't even finished cleaning the tanks we're going to use, so we're a looong way away from the different kinds of fish, bet it's a big help! I'll be sure to keep you posted.

    Thanks!
    Formerly known as Silenceisgod!

  5. #5
    Eats genetically engineered tomatoes Sig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Michigan -- If you donít like the weather, blink!
    Posts
    900
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Okay! So the design phase is almost over. We have a forty gallon tank that has been cleaned, a filter cycling, though that's more to get the initial gunk out because we'll be using a protein skimmer, and a heater trying to get the right temperature. The substrate is fine sand with pebbles/gravel making a hill on one side. We don't have the live rock in yet.

    We're not 100% sure on the fish list, but this is the best we have so far:

    royal gramma basslet x1

    blue tuxedo urchin x1

    Banggai cardinalfish x2

    peppermint shrimp x2

    skunk cleaner shrimp x2

    Any suggestions? I want more shrimp, but my partners don't, so I can't do that unless it's really spectacular.

    Thanks!
    Formerly known as Silenceisgod!

  6. #6
    Physalaemus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SF Bay Area, USA
    Posts
    217
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Seeing as how the FO in FOWLR stands for Fish-Only, I'm not sure why you're including invertebrates at all? I hope the substrate is some sort of calcareous aragonite sand or coral rubble. It adds a great deal of buffering capacity to the water.

    You're light on algae eaters. For a smallish tank, I'd recommend a lawnmower blenny and a small sailfin tang / foxface (be careful the dorsal spines are venomous).

    Get the live rock in asap. You will see a big die off of stuff living in it that will cause a big ammonia spike. The sooner that is dealt with, the sooner you can start stocking.

  7. #7
    Eats genetically engineered tomatoes Sig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Michigan -- If you donít like the weather, blink!
    Posts
    900
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    We're using it as "no plants or coral". My teacher said it's okay. About the live rock, It'll probably be in 1-2 weeks before the fish. Is that enough time? The rock is currently in another tank without any fish, if that makes a difference. The blenny looks like a good fit, but it looks like it gets really big. Will that be a problem? Of the fish we have already, will they be a good fit for the tank with the addition of an algae eater?

    Thanks for the help!
    Formerly known as Silenceisgod!

  8. #8
    Physalaemus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SF Bay Area, USA
    Posts
    217
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Too big? I've never seen one bigger than 4 inches :P

    The rock cycling in another tanks is fine. I was concerned that you would be putting it right into the tank from the shipping box and then adding fish.

    Otherwise, the fish list looks great. I might suggest a third Banggai cardinal (they like to be in groups). Keep an eye on the cleaner shrimp. They can pester fish in smallish tanks.

    With the Urchin, the lawnmower blenny may not be as necessary (they overlap in diet). Maybe a pistol shrimp and a prawn goby would make a good duo They're a blast to watch as they do their symbiotic thing. Their digging will also keep the sand aerated and healthy.

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •