User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 9 to 15 of 15

Thread: 30 Hex up and running

  1. #9
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Steve: Guess what! You just surpassed my limit of expertise. We (the wholesaler) didn't have your level of equipment sophistication. We got as advanced as purchasing a "system" of interconnected tanks for the fish, but never got beyond individual tanks, protein skimmers, and outside filters for the inverts. Also, seven years removed from hobby [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/sad.gif[/img] probably put me significantly behind in the technological advancements. I'm much better at scientific names, variety of livestock, nitrogen cycle, and medications. But please DO keep on sharing your enthusiasm. Never understood why why Premnas biaculatus isn't Amphiprion, like the other clowns. See, that's what I know from poring over textbooks and availability sheets. Oh well.

  2. #10
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    San Antonio, Texas; USA
    Posts
    2,363
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ahh, I wouldn't say I am so much advanced, a SCWD is a simple device it's been around for a year or more I think... it has one inlet, two outlets, pressure builds up inside, and switches flow from A outlet to B outlet, timing depends on the strength of the pump driving it. this produces a wave action that is beneficial to corals and anemones. Also makes a nice vigorous current for your fish to navigate.

    Refugiums are the next generation of the SUMP, which I am sure you are familiary with. Sumps were created to take the equipment out of the tank, your drain water out of the tank, filter it, heat it, skim it, run through a calcium reactor, you name it, and then use a pump to send it back up into the tank. The refugium is taking this method, and returning to a naturalistic approach. (as far as you want to go.) you add lights to the setup as if it were a main tank, your skimmer and other equipment can still run off of it, but in addition, now you add a THICK live sand substrate, and organisms that will keep it stirred up. Live rock and macro algae are also used here, liverock being the best Bio filter ever imagined, and macro algae can be A) harvested and traded/destroyed, or fed back to your herbivores. Some people have gone completely away from the technology, removing protien skimmers and all filtration, and just use powerheads to circulate the water. THey grow mangroves out of their refugiums, that suck up the nutrients in the water.

    In addition, regugiums provide a nice breeding place for amphipods and copepods, these little critters, free from predation in the main tank, reproduce, and get sucked into the return and deposited in the main tank, where fish, anemones, feather dusters and corals eatem up.

    I love the bio-diversity capable of being achieved in a reef system. It is quite simply, awesome.
    \"Maybe in order to understand mankind, we have to look at the word itself: \"Mankind\". Basically, it\'s made up of two separate words - \"mank\" and \"ind\". What do these words mean ? It\'s a mystery, and that\'s why so is mankind.\" ~ Jack Handey

  3. #11
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    All this is new to me, but very impressive. And I thought the "system" was the next best thing to replicators and holodecks. I'll tell ya one thing, though, when I first got involved with the saltwater department we had all individual tanks - mostly 70 & 30 gallons. Every time (which was a couple few times a week) a shipment came in, partularly with the inverts, we "held our breath." Even though you pull out what you think was obviously d.o.a., there stood a good chance that either you missed something or something else, on the verge, did die. It also set off a chain reaction and the tank just had to be drained and filled again. There were times when you unintentionally exceeded the tank's capacity for fish, and the next morning you discover - wipeout. It was ennerving to leave work with everything seeming to be fine and coming in the next morning to have a tank be wiped out. The system eliminated THAT experience and you can stock 2-3 times as many fish per gallon as the independent tanks. It also made a tremendous difference between shipment receipt and morning after mortality. Reluctantly, I was also finally convinced to keep a low concentration of copper. Never experienced cryptocarian again. We never did anything advanced with the inverts. I DO remember bringing Tonga rock once, as well as Florida live rock, on occasion. However, we weren't geared toward creating reef tanks. When you are a wholesaler, you just bring 'em and move 'em out as fast as you can. I do remember live sand. Protein skimmers were fairly new. We brought in our corals from Indonesia and the fish & some inverts came from the Phillipines (only because you had to for variety and price), Bali, Hawaii, and Sri Lanka. We also brought in tank-raised clowns (percula & tomato) from Florida. As with freshwater, the livestock travel for days and one never knows just how stressed or alive they will be on arrival. So we were constantly dealing with meds, acclimation, and bacterial diseases. Wholesaling is significantly different that the local petshop, which is also different from the home tank. Well, that was my experience.

  4. #12
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    San Antonio, Texas; USA
    Posts
    2,363
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    sadly it seems as if the phillapino's have 'hunted' their reefs to the verge of extinction with their collection practices. They aer cyanide bombers, and don't realize while it may make a fish easy to catch, the fish usually dies, and they irrepreably damage the reef around it.

    Most importers will not bring in livestock from the phillipines anymore, in hopes the pressure will yield to better collection practices. Hopefully, the phillipines will can the industry all together for the next 20 years and allow their beleagured reefs to re-build.
    \"Maybe in order to understand mankind, we have to look at the word itself: \"Mankind\". Basically, it\'s made up of two separate words - \"mank\" and \"ind\". What do these words mean ? It\'s a mystery, and that\'s why so is mankind.\" ~ Jack Handey

  5. #13
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Last I knew there have been attempts to rebuild reefs, artificially. But it may be too little too late. As with the clownfishes, I believe there have also been attempts to do "tank-raised" damsels. Who knows - maybe there will be more success in this area, akin to the Florida fishfarms and what the folks in Singapore have done with freshwater fish. We can only hope.

  6. #14
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    San Antonio, Texas; USA
    Posts
    2,363
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    in recent years there have been great successes in tank raising quite a few species of salt water fish. The ones that remain elusive, are the ones such as the lion, that go through a planktonic state of existence... kind of hard to re-create the level of precision needed for that.

    UPDATE: Tank is completely cycled.

    Nitrates: barely registering
    Nitrites: Not registering on the kit at all. 0.0
    PH: 8.6 (perfect for reef)
    Amonia: Non existent. 0.0
    Salinity: 1.023 (need to adjust to 1.022) but other than that, oh happy day.
    \"Maybe in order to understand mankind, we have to look at the word itself: \"Mankind\". Basically, it\'s made up of two separate words - \"mank\" and \"ind\". What do these words mean ? It\'s a mystery, and that\'s why so is mankind.\" ~ Jack Handey

  7. #15
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ah, there you are! Yup, the tank is cycled. One thing that I noticed about salinity is that people have their favorite levels, just as CP folks have their favorite soil mixtures. A textbook I read through listed fish according to their pictures (juvenile & adult), their location, temperature, and salinity. Nearly everything was listed as being 1.022. Bearing that in mind, the pet shop owners would swear by what they did. Some liked it ~1.020. Others as high as 1.025. Apparently, the lower the salinity, the less active the fish. Conversely, the higher the salinity, the more active the fish. However, parasites are less happy in lower salinity. But a less active fish is more susceptible to parasites. Higher salinity = more activity for both fish and parasite, but less susceptibility. Go figure! Corals, though, like a higher salinity. None of this information is anything I've actually observed from taking care of them. I am only parroting what I've been told. However, I can speak from personal experience about the philosophy and approaches to ridding of parasites. But that's another topic. I remember a pH of 8.3 -> 8.4, but that might have been for the fish. Planktonic state? They eat plankton, too? BVy the time I see them they are eating feeder guppies (Dwarf Lions) and comets for the Volitans & Antennata. So, what's your next step?

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •