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Thread: 2 clones: D. bintata var. dichotoma

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    SDCPs's Avatar
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    2 clones: D. bintata var. dichotoma

    Hello friends,

    I've recently been reading about sundews, and found this article interesting

    I'd thought I'd offer:

    I have 3 packages of 2 genetically different (self-incompatible) forms of D. binata var. dichotoma. It takes two clones to produce seed. I have plants from the seed also (seed-grown plants not for trade).

    Just putting this out there for you who like CP seed, and like to have genetically different plants.

    They do get rather large:


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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Most forms of Drosera binata in cultivation are either sterile or have self-incompatible flowers. If the flowers are self-incompatible, you will need to have two unrelated plants of the same type to get seed. That may be difficult to do as most of the common forms are traded around as plants or leaf or root cuttings and are thus clones of the same plant.

    The forms that do produce seed and are listed on the Seed Bank tend to be the smaller, "T" form-like plants. The fertile varieties produce lots of seed and can become weeds in CP collections. Nice weeds.
    Thanks for sharing.

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    SDCPs's Avatar
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    Thank you for exposing the meat of the article!

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    LOL! At leas you know that someone read it!

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    Copper's Avatar
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    Two, lol
    I am just like a Super Hero, but without the power or motivation.................and the funky suit.

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    Moderator and 2011 NASC Secretary Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Some botanists believe that there aren't sufficient differences between the various forms of Drosera binata to warrant them being granted separate classification, such as variety, subspecies, form, etc. So, taxonomically, they are all just Drosera binata.

    This includes:
    Drosera binata f. extrema
    Drosera binata f. multifida
    Drosera binata f. pedata
    Drosera binata var. dichotoma
    Drosera binata var. multifida
    Drosera binata var. rubra
    Drosera cunninghamii
    Drosera dichotoma
    Drosera dichotoma var. longifolia
    Drosera dichotoma var. rubra
    Drosera dinata
    Drosera flagellifera
    Drosera intermedia
    Drosera lineata
    Drosera pedata
    and probably more I don't know about.

    There are, however, two Drosera binata registered as cultivars, Drosera 'Giant' and Drosera 'Marston Dragon'. Of course that doesn't mean there aren't many other, different and desirable clones of Drosera binata. It just means that many botanists don't recognize them as being unique enough to warrant separate classifications (unless perhaps more work were done to support their separation). We horticulturists, however, can certainly use the cultivar registration system to name and define the wonderful diversity that exists in this species.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 12-07-2010 at 11:49 AM.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A
    Pinguicula Links: Growing

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    SDCPs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimscott View Post
    LOL! At leas you know that someone read it!
    I don't really care if anybody read it or not. I just put it out there for your guys's benefit...and offered the plants to those who like to get seed from their plants...like me!
    Quote Originally Posted by Copper View Post
    Two, lol
    What was your impression? Boring?...interesting?
    Quote Originally Posted by Joseph Clemens View Post
    Some botanists believe that there aren't sufficient differences between the various forms of Drosera binata to warrant them being granted separate classification, such as variety, subspecies, form, etc. So, taxonomically, they are all just Drosera binata.

    This includes:
    Drosera binata f. extrema
    Drosera binata f. multifida
    Drosera binata f. pedata
    Drosera binata var. dichotoma
    Drosera binata var. multifida
    Drosera binata var. rubra
    Drosera cunninghamii
    Drosera dichotoma
    Drosera dichotoma var. longifolia
    Drosera dichotoma var. rubra
    Drosera dinata
    Drosera flagellifera
    Drosera intermedia
    Drosera lineata
    Drosera pedata
    and probably more I don't know about.

    There are, however, two Drosera binata registered as cultivars, Drosera 'Giant' and Drosera 'Marston Dragon'. Of course that doesn't mean there aren't many other, different and desirable clones of Drosera binata. It just means that many botanists don't recognize them as being unique enough to warrant separate classifications (unless perhaps more work were done to support their separation). We horticulturists, however, can certainly use the cultivar registration system to name and define the wonderful diversity that exists in this species.
    Oh wow. I wonder where my plants fall into this. I was told by someone that because they fork multiple times (max of twelve) they are dichotoma. But if I could refine it...do you think its possible to ID these further?

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    Moderator and 2011 NASC Secretary Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    I first heard about Drosera binata in the Carnivorous Plant Newsletter, and other forms of the plant were described by J. A. Mazrimus in an article he wrote for CPN volume V, No. 1, pg. 15. There are also other interesting forms described, such as the one called "multifida extrema", from Stradbroke, Island in Australia, and, of course, each seed grown clone can demonstrate its own characteristics. Many hybrids have been produced between plants of different habit. Drosera binata 'Marston Dragon' is a cultivar said to be a product of such hybridization. My own first exposure to the various types of Drosera binata was from Bob Hanrahan, through his company, "World Insectivorous Plants", or W.I.P. Besides the various price lists I received from W.I.P. which described these various forms, there were individual slips with detailed descriptions and cultivation instructions sent with each plant.

    If you are a member of the ICPS, you can look up these historical articles at their member-only web pages.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A
    Pinguicula Links: Growing

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joseph Clemens View Post
    I first heard about Drosera binata in the Carnivorous Plant Newsletter, and other forms of the plant were described by J. A. Mazrimus in an article he wrote for CPN volume V, No. 1, pg. 15. There are also other interesting forms described, such as the one called "multifida extrema", from Stradbroke, Island in Australia, and, of course, each seed grown clone can demonstrate its own characteristics. Many hybrids have been produced between plants of different habit. Drosera binata 'Marston Dragon' is a cultivar said to be a product of such hybridization. My own first exposure to the various types of Drosera binata was from Bob Hanrahan, through his company, "World Insectivorous Plants", or W.I.P. Besides the various price lists I received from W.I.P. which described these various forms, there were individual slips with detailed descriptions and cultivation instructions sent with each plant.

    If you are a member of the ICPS, you can look up these historical articles at their member-only web pages.
    I am a member. That's volume 5 no. 1 page 15, thanks. I will look it up when I get around to it. Please disregard that section of my PM them. I'd be the best person to ID my own plants as I know their habits.

    Thank you for this valuable reference!

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