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Thread: D. filiformis "all red"

  1. #1
    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    I have been running up against a bit of a conundrum and I wanted to bring it up here to get other peoples thoughts on it.

    For a few years now I have been trying (not very diligently) to get my hands on the "all red" form of D. filiformis (also called "FL red".) To the best of my knowledge the "all red" filiformis should have red leaves as well as red tenticles. Like this one here. All the plants I have recieved labeled as this (3 so far) look to me to be a nothing more than a typical form of D. filiformis that has vibrant red stalks as well as glands but the leaves are still totally green. Living in GA I grow my plants outside and they recieve many hours of direct sun so I know it is not a matter of poor light. If this is indeed the case then it seems there are actually a number of plants being passed around as "all red" that are not.

    I have recently learned that there may be a commercial grower that has been selling a plant labeled as either "red filiformis" or "filiformis red". I believe that this plant is the one with the vibrant red tenticles and glands and that people have just taken to lumping it in with the "all red" plant as if the plants were the same. Clearly this is not the case.

    I feel that people need to be a bit more diligent with how they label plants. It has been noted many times that plants labeled as D. capensis "all red" have been shipped and recieved and these plants are actually green. Now we are beginning to see the same happen with these filiformis. It seems like commone sence to me that if a plant does not meet the criteria of being "all red" (i.e. the leaves are red) that it should not be labeled as such.
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

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  2. #2
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    And to think I was given seeds of both and they have successfully germinated. The plants do certainly appear to be reddish, but maybe that's because they have been at the SW window sills for several months?

  3. #3
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    Hmmm...I THINK, but not sure, that Jan/Lauderdale has or had D. filiformis "all red" or "FL red". Maybe he can share with you what his plants look like.
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

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    D. filiformis, all red form is just that, all red. Leaves and tentacles. Found in Washington County, Florida, some were found to go dormant for the winter, and some, kept warm, lived all year long. Strange d. filiformis form it may be, if it ain't all red, leaf and tentacle, you don't have an all red. Joe Mazrimas showed me his, and said they were red like they were year round.
    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

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