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Thread: What does a B. liniflora seedling look like?

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    And these are mine, which are Elgecko's:


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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]If you want to make it grow faster, start feeding it mayflies or fruitflies.
    Perhaps this is wishful thinking! The most recent research suggests that B liniflora, unlike B filifolia, cannot produce enzymes, and so cannot digest prey without the aid of capsid bugs. Nice pictures of healthy plants, by the way.

    Greg

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]The most recent research suggests that B liniflora, unlike B filifolia, cannot produce enzymes, and so cannot digest prey without the aid of capsid bugs. Nice pictures of healthy plants, by the way.
    Very interesting. So giving my little plant bugs won't do a thing then, right? It'll just take the life of an innocent bug [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_k_ani_32.gif[/img]

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    It does appear so. I'm somewhat baffled by the whole thing, to be honest. My own plants produce extra fluid when they catch a larger insect such as a moth, and it is also known that the plants possess sessile glands that are able to readily absorb pre-digested fluid. I have read that fungi may play a role in digestion (I think that D'Amato, for example, mentions this possibility), but I don't know of any proof for this theory. Perhaps someone has fed some seedlings and deprived others of food and compared the growth rates?

    Interestingly, Hartmeyer, on his website, refers to some very interesting tests that were done on Roridula and its resident Pameridea bugs. In these experiments, fruit flies were fed food containing nitrogen that was tagged in a particular way so it could be readily identified. The fruit flies were then placed on the Roridula plants. The bugs, which are able to move around the Roridual plants without being caught, sucked the captured fruit flies dry, and then deposited droppings on the Roridula plants' leaves. The scientists who conducted the experiment were able do demonstrate that the tagged nitrogen had made its way into the Roridula plants, presumably via the Pameridea bugs. Therefore, it is arguable that Roridula is carnivorous; it certainly traps prey and is able to benefit from its ability to do this. I think that B. liniflora probably works in exactly the same way, although I am puzzled by the fact that it does appear to produce juices of some sort when fed.

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    7santiago's Avatar
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    no, fungus might of decomposed the bug...
    Mens Et Manus

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Just so ya know, in my picture, the little brown things stuck to their leaves - are fruitflies. What they were doing with them... I don't know. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img]

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    I don't know if it's fungus that decomposes the insect, My byblis [Edit: spelling: Byblis, genus names are always written with an initial capital letter.] is already pretty much huge and I feed it any chance I get and my other byblis [Edit: spelling: Byblis, genus names are always written with an initial capital letter.] I ignore and never feed and they are 2 days apart. Is it a coincedence, I don't know [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img] , but hey whatever works :P




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    An update on this situation:

    That seedling is definitely a B. liniflora! Whoo hoo! I've watched it progress these past few days and I can see a ton of dew on its small leaves. It's growing fast, as it's doubled in size since it sprouted last week.

    Some other great news is that I had two more B. liniflora seedlings sprout in the past few days, in different pots throughout my collection. There's hope just yet! Booyeah Grandma!

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