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Thread: What variety is this little guy?

  1. #9

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    I have found the D. capensis seedlings don't mind being moved that much. I take a jewlers screwdriver (real small screw driver) and dig up the seedling with that. Not saying that is the only tool that will work, just what I had handy at the time. I try to get a clump of soil with the plantlet and put it were I want. I have also been covering them with a clear plastic cup just to provide alittle extra humidity right after the transplant, don't really think it's needed, but it hasn't hurt any either.

    I should mention the seedlings I moved were much smaller then those you have pictured. A teacher wanted a couple, but they only had their first 2 leaves formed.

    The one in the upper right is close to the size of yours, and the other little guys are the size of the ones I gave to the teacher, I checked on them the next week after I gave them to her and they were still alive.

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  2. #10
    白人看不懂 Drosera36's Avatar
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    Yeah, those 'Alba' look much different from mine.

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  3. #11

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    It looks like some of my small seedlings have red hairs too, and I have not had any other D. capensis flower but the D. capensis 'Alba'. But they could also be D. spatulata or D.capillaris. I'll have to wait until they get bigger before I can see what they are.
    \"Anyway, no drug, not even alcohol, causes the fundamental ills of society. If we're looking for the source of our troubles, we shouldn't test people for drugs, we should test them for stupidity, ignorance, greed and love of power.\"
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  4. #12
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    I've noticed (back when I actually had the alba variety) that when they produced seeds, not all of them retained the alba characteristic. Many seedlings reverted back to typical (even though I KNOW there was no cross pollination).

    As for moving/replanting seedlings....They don't mind. Heck, you can YANK them out, SQUISH them in wet paper towel, have the package get lost in the mail for 5 or 10 days....and most of them STILL recover.

    I had a capensis sprout in my compost heap in 98% darkness and almost bone dry (must have gotten a root in there at some point).

    They're like roaches....
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  5. #13

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    Drosera36's seedlings are probably hybridised, perhaps with D. capensis 'Broad Leaf' or something, observing the shape of the laminae, although they are still young.

    The plant Copper has sent to Dr Ziemer is seemingly not a hybrid but a result of self pollination, although her pink-flowered clones must be successfully hybridised.

    Oh, and in most cases, cross pollination is done by insects.

  6. #14
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Here is what a D. capensis 'Alba' or 'Albino' looks like:


  7. #15
    白人看不懂 Drosera36's Avatar
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    Well, my little guy's new leaves are getting narrower and narrower, and the newest unfolding leaf seems really narrow, so we'll just have to see what it looks like then. But I do have another question: Does it matter how old peat is for dews? I mean, the peat in my little guys pot has been in there for over a year, and it seems pretty firm, and looks as though it has compacted together, so you no longer can tell what the soil ingredients were. My baby dews seem to enjoy this soil, and the pot is at least 3 inches deep, so is it necessary to repot them?

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  8. #16
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    most young capensis, atleast from what ive seen, look like a broad leaf form but it doesnt take long for them to get past that if they arent. most on my "typical form coming up from roots in one of my pots look like lil broadleaf's but that will change in a few weeks
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