User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: byblis, or drosophyllum

  1. #1
    7santiago's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    MIT, Cambridge, MA
    Posts
    451
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I sowed a couple of drosophyllum seeds four months ago. After the death of the adult byblis linifolia and my three filifolia i had many other seedlings pop out. But now i have a strange seedling that looks like drosophyllum... how can i distinguish the both? And how can i find out if my seedlings are linifolia or filifolia?


    What a mistake...
    Mens Et Manus

  2. #2
    indymental's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    England
    Posts
    189
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Once they are grown on a bit it is easier to tell. Drosophyllum grow in a rosette fashion and the stem only forms as the old leaves die off.

    http://www.cpuk.org/~vicbrown/images...llum/Dros2.jpg

    Byblis form a stem as they grow like this,

    http://www.fischermans-antik.de/Liste.d....lia.jpg

    I can't find any seedling pics of filifolia to compare to Drosophyllum but this is one of a Drosophyllum as a seedling.

    http://img460.imageshack.us/img460/4...hyllum33ru.jpg

    Byblis will grow a bit of the stem after every second leaf, whereas drosophyllum don't

    I don't know if that helps you at all.

  3. #3
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Here's a Byblis pic:



    An here is a Drosphyllum seedling:


  4. #4

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Birmingham, UK
    Posts
    104
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If subjected to strong enough light, the glands onDrosophyllum seedlings should turn red. This will not happen to a B filifolia seedling however much light it receives. Although the photo is poor, the seedling on the left at the front of the picture is B filifolia (the one on the right is B rorida). I do have some unphotographed seedlings that are growing in slightly better conditions that are more compact and stickier, but otherwise look very similar.


  5. #5
    7santiago's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    MIT, Cambridge, MA
    Posts
    451
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Oh NO, i have both b. filifolia, liniflora and drosophyllum.... Can they live together in the same pot as adults? Maybe the byblis will live for 4 months and then i can supply more dry conditions for drosophyllum ? Or should i keep the byblis alive just long enough to get seeds... [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img]
    Mens Et Manus

  6. #6
    indymental's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    England
    Posts
    189
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sometimes if the plants are not too well advanced you can repot them at such a young age. The roots won't have progressed too far into the peat mix yet so you can take the plant and a big chunk of the surrounding peat mix so the tiny roots are not disturbed then plant the whole thing as a plug. It's risky but it can be done.

  7. #7
    chloroplast's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    824
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Oh NO, i have both b. filifolia, liniflora and drosophyllum.... Can they live together in the same pot as adults? Maybe the byblis will live for 4 months and then i can supply more dry conditions for drosophyllum ? Or should i keep the byblis alive just long enough to get seeds...
    Byblis and drosophyllum probably won't be able to coexist in the same pot--the former require much wetter soil than the latter. I would attempt transplanting the byblis, simply because I've found their seed easier to obtain and germinate so they're not as "precious" to me as a drosophyllum seedling!
    Good luck with whatever you decide to do.
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
    Member, International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS)
    Member, North American Sarracenia Conservancy (NASC)
    Member, The Carnivorous Plant Society (CPS)

  8. #8

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Birmingham, UK
    Posts
    104
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Byblis seedlings are very easy to transplant successfully. Simply scoop the seedling up with a lot of the surrounding soil, and disturb the Drosophyllum as little as possible. You should have no problems whatsoever.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •