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Thread: petiolaris complex

  1. #9

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    I'd go deep and narrow, but in cultivation (under my conditions) I found overpotting was a bad idea. I lost 3 species after repotting into larger pots and the plants were thriving when I repotted. I guess this could have triggered a dormancy reaction as all 3 stopped growing. By the time i noticed this and began drying off the medium it was already too late. I never had this issue using smaller containers. Maybe things are different in Australia?
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    I was thinking the same thing after I posted. Of course, it probably does not hurt to be living in the same area of the World they grow in Nature.
    Nice to see you posting again, btw, WD.

    Cheers,

    Joe

  3. #11

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    Nice to be back Joe, thanks. Well, D. petiolaris are a challenge here (at least for me). We don't get the light and heat the NT in Oz gets. Oswego gets 49% of the available sunlight and that is at a fairly Northern latitude. I've only grown a dozen or so plants of different species, so I am no expert. My best results have always been in a light and fluffy mix that dries off fairly quickly - about the only use I have for perlite. I wish I had more plants to experiment with, but seed rarely was viable when I got it and plants too expensive to mess around with. So don't take my advise as gospel by any means, but if you are up North do pay close attention to indications of dormancy: cold wet roots are bad medicine for the Pets, esp. when not in active growth ( although without a doubt there is a grower out there who grows them the size of pancakes in an icy slush, lol)
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  4. #12
    chloroplast's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]I'd go deep and narrow, but in cultivation (under my conditions) I found overpotting was a bad idea.
    Hey, Tamlin. Thanks for the additional info. I was going to pot them up into my regular 2.5"W pots, but I've got some deeper-than-normal varieties that I'll give a try instead. Take care.
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  5. #13
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    As a sidenote, I've noticed that D. paradoxa has shallow roots that don't extend nearly to the capacity of a 2.5" pot. D. ordensis; on the other hand, have are more developed root system. I have four 1-year old D. ordensis plants growing in the same 4" pot, and roots are already visible through the drainage holes.

    Has anyone else observed this, or am I on my own here?

    -Homer

  6. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (homer @ May 07 2006,12:18)]As a sidenote, I've noticed that D. paradoxa has shallow roots that don't extend nearly to the capacity of a 2.5" pot. D. ordensis; on the other hand, have are more developed root system. I have four 1-year old D. ordensis plants growing in the same 4" pot, and roots are already visible through the drainage holes.

    Has anyone else observed this, or am I on my own here?

    -Homer
    I'm not too sure I've paid a lot of attention to this but my initial observations indicate that root length is more a function of the environment in which the plants are growing than a species thing. In my 'dry' tank, the plants all have robust root systems (& 1 of the 2 D. kenneallyi had an amazingly huge complex of roots).

    When I received some plants that had been grown sitting in water 24/7 - they had almost no roots at all (less than 1"). These same plants in my 'dry' tank developed large root systems in a few months.

    I'll try to pay more attention when repotting/dividing to see if I notice a pattern...
    All the best,
    Ron
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  7. #15
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    That's a general truism; all things being equal, a plant in drier conditions has incentive to seek water and develop roots. In contrast, the same plant, in wetter conditions doesn;thave the incentive to look for water.

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