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Thread: How is D. paradoxa propagated?

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    Moderator Cindy's Avatar
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    Unhappy

    I've tried D. petiolaris from leaf cuttings but they died on me. However, the clumping habit has given me many new plants. Is D. paradoxa like that too?
    Cindy

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    War. War never changes. Est's Avatar
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    Jim should be able to set you right with this one, he seems to be quite sucessful in growing it.

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Thanks. J.T., but actually Ron Lane, Greg Allan, and Homer are. But the plant does seem to clump on its own. I look at my old photo and knowing that I've given away about 5 plants and still see at least 8 of them, amid the live LFS, including baby plants. They flower like crazy, but I am not skilled with manual pollinatin.

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Cindy @ May 04 2006,10:40)]I've tried D. petiolaris from leaf cuttings but they died on me. However, the clumping habit has given me many new plants. Is D. paradoxa like that too?
    Growth point division is always the easiest form of propagation when your plants form new growth points. D. paradoxa is unique (now) in this group as it forms a 'stem'. Sometimes the new growth points are up on the stem and have no roots. You can still divide (or behead) but it gets a bit trickier.

    If you don't get any new clumps, keep trying leaf propagation in water or live LFS (I prefer water). The JanW method produces a high % of strikes for me with glabrous plants (sometimes even 100%... ).

    Good luck w/ your efforts.
    All the best,
    Ron
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    There is always the ancient suggested method (which I never tried) of slicing the crown down the middle of the apical growth point, keeping roots on both halves. Scary but it might work, especially with the hairy species.
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]slicing the crown down the middle of the apical growth point
    I've heard that as well, but am afraid to do it. I'm still working on trying to get viable seed!

    As far a D. paradoxa goes, I've had the best luck with them out of all the Petiolaris Complex Drosera. Best results occur if you pull the leaves out in clumps and don't pull them apart. I put them in water very similar to what Ron Lane does.

    best of luck,

    Homer

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Tamlin Dawnstar @ May 05 2006,10:29)]There is always the ancient suggested method (which I never tried) of slicing the crown down the middle of the apical growth point, keeping roots on both halves. Scary but it might work, especially with the hairy species.
    The Zen Master has even recommended quartering the plants....

    I also have not tried it (yet) but may go ahead on a 'spare' (is there such a thing?)

    However, based on observations during divisions and repotting, I've noticed that this "apical growth point" seems to be smaller in this group of plants than others. In some plants, this 'point' seems to be a fairly broad area with easily enough space to divide in half and have plenty of roots. Here, the roots (& leaves) appear to converge in an extremely small area (hence, why it's called a 'point'. If one missed by a fraction of an inch, there would be a pile of leaves & roots but the body of the plant would still be in one piece - not 2.
    All the best,
    Ron
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