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Thread: D Adelae - Willy Makeit

  1. #1

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    I am tying to save a couple of adelae that I think got too much sun and I think Ive got it but I wanted to check with you people. I still have them in the little plastic cubes the came in, and I had them, outside on my covered patio so they got some morning sun but they got cooked so I moved them inside onto a windowsill that gets shaded sun. I was being somewhat frugal with watering, didnt want them swimming, and I think that didnt help either as for a good 2 weeks the adelae still didnt seem to be improving, some growth but stunted, deformed, dewless, etc, so now Ive upped the watering to full on bog, watering every day to the brim. And it seems to have helped. New growth is coming in greener, still some damage but I think lingering from the sunstroke. And the control plants (2 more undamaged adelae that I picked up to grow with the damaged ones to see how the grow conditions I was experimenting with would affect otherwise completely healthy plants) are also still thriving, surprisingly (cause the light on the sill is very indirect) getting enough light to tint reddish. So really what I was wondering is if the sopping bog approach is ideal for these plants as it appears to be or am I looking for long-run trouble of another variety like root rot or fungus? Cause they seem to drink up the water pretty quick, I have to top off pretty much every day. Thanks!

  2. #2
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Yup, not a happy camper at the moment. Yes, it can be salvaged. This is one plant that can do well just sitting in a window sill. I fill it up with water and let it go until nearly empty, before filling again. The plant pictured below was a Lowes rescue and for the bried amount of time it was outside, it was infested with aphids. Had to drown the plant to rid the aphids. The plant survived and as you can see, it does well enough inside to snd up 8 flowers this spring, as well about as many plantlets. My approach is simple - open tray, window sill, peat & sand, with LFS on top.



    Same plant, last September:



    Found it buried and white in a Lowes 3 in 1 cube last summer.

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    SpyCspider's Avatar
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    Hey Jim,

    I'd like to know the secret to your success with growing D. adelae in open air at the windowsill. I tried to do the same with two Lowes D. adelae: 1 I had uncovered slowly to let it adjust and it seemed to be doing ok; however, one day after feeding an ant to it, it simply stopped dewing. The entire plant ceased to dew even though it was still producing leaves and at this point in time, the mother plant is still bone-dry. I had put the dome back on and now plantlets are starting to sprout from the base.

    The other one I kept under a humidity dome the whole time and it dewed profusely and turned red in the sun. However, I couldn't feed it anything since every prey started to mold in the enclosed environment. It also has been sprouting dewy plantlets recently. This plant does seem to get more sunlight than the 1st one as they are on different windowsills (one at home, the other at my dorm).

    Could the light be the determining factor? Heat? At first glance, it seems like humidity is the only major difference.

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    I can't know for sure, but when one buys a plant from a garden center, it is already in some state of stress and if it is really suffering, the mere action of opening the dome and putting it in significantly (to the given plant) drier or warmer or colder conditions, can be enough to put it over the edge. I shicked the daylights out of a cobra lily by taking it out of the cube and putting it outside. Stopping dew production is a classic indicator that it is in shock. D. adalae, in particular, can be an enigmatic plant. One teen described it as ''evil". It can do as Cephalotus does and just die for no apparent reason and others report that after several weeks of "plauing 'possum" it comes back / and / or send up new plants from the roots. I experienced one plant die back but didn't wait long enough to see a recovery or new plants from the roots. When reasonably healthy, open tray at a window sill works fine, leting the water evaporate and then refilling. My opinion is that significant changes in conditions, with a stressed out plant, leads to shock.

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    SpyCspider's Avatar
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    ok thanks. Yea, let's hope the plantlets are tougher than their mothers. It's funny that D. adelae is marketed as a beginner plant when I read so many people having problems with it and believe there are much easier sundews to grow out there. D. capensis for example seems to suffer from no shock or bounces back quickly when introduced into a new environment.

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    D. capensis was neither impressed nor amused when I took it from my bedroom window (70 degrees) to my car (15 degrees) to the lab (70 degrees). Nearly all of its leaves withered by noon. A week later a new leaf emerged and in the summer it bloomed.

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    What do you mean when you "drown" aphids? I'm looking for safe ways to destroy aphids...

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    That is the safe way of dealing with aphids. What I do is take the infected pot and place in a container that is taller and wider, such that the pot can fit totally inside. Then fill the container with distilled water past the height of the pot, so that the plant is totally submerged. With no place to go, the aphds are also under water. Soon you will see aphids floating, eventually, after a few days, they drown. I had a sundew submerged for 2 weeks, but that's "overkill". The plant will look like a "drowned rat", but it will recover. Mine always have. Flea collars placed near them had no effect and after that it's using pesticides.

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