User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 17

Thread: D. neocaledonica

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    north carolina
    Posts
    91
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I recently obtained a small plant but it hasn't been doing much for me. It seems to be very picky about humidity. Is there anyone here that has grown it succesfully? Any tips?
    Thanks,
    David

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I found this to be a rather difficult to establish species, but once I got the conditions right it prospered and flowered for me. My plant is in pure milled live LFS in a full sized pot. Water was about 4 cm under the medium surface, achieved by putting the pot in a jardeniere arrangement and keeping the water topped off to that level. Water reserves were changed weekly. I grew it outdoors in the warm months. It seems to require a lot of light for good typical growth. I got the plant to establish by providing constantly humid (near 100%) humidity in a terrarium environment, and acclimated slowly to outdoor conditions once humidity was over 60%. The plant is sensitive to low humidity until it establishes as you have observed. If you dont have a terrarium, try a dome or plastic bag. This species although related closely to D. spatulata is rather a unique looking Sundew and very beautiful when well grown.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  3. #3
    chloroplast's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    824
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Mine is in pure new zealand LFS sitting in 2-3" water which is allowed to nearly dry off before being replenished. It is 4" under 160W cool white fluorescent lighting (14h photoperiod). I got it as a seedling, so I placed a sandwitch bag (with some holes punched in it) around the container for added humidity. The bag is still on and the plant is growing well. Hope this helps.
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
    Member, International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS)
    Member, North American Sarracenia Conservancy (NASC)
    Member, The Carnivorous Plant Society (CPS)

  4. #4
    Capslock's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    3,088
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Mine is in roughly the same conditions as chloroplast, but I never bothered with bags or anything. It's in highland conditions close under fluorescent tubes, but otherwise open air. It's in evenly mixed peat and sand. It has done well, and is now flowering. Anyone know if it self-polinates?



    PS: That's P. lusitanica that found it's way in via wayward seed. P lusitanica will grow happily with any cp, it seems.

    Capslock
    Malo Periculosam Libertatem Quam Quietum Servitium

    My photos are copyright-free and public domain

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Mine didn't self pollinate. I have never heard of any seed of this species, and I looked for it fairly hard. My plant was self sterile and hand polination didn't work either. It propagates very readily from leaf cuttings placed on damp peat.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  6. #6

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    California
    Posts
    620
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sorry I don't have any pics to support it, but both of my 5 year old plants have just finished flowering and both of the flower spikes were all filled with seed. They flower and seed every year without any extra help from me. Under my observation I find this species performs best when grown in cool highland conditions with high relative humidity. It definitely hates the heat. I don't know what triggers the production of seed of fertility of the blooms, but it does happen.

    Phil

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Southern CA, US
    Posts
    1,058
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    D.neocaledonica produced seeds for me also. Unfortunetly I lost the parent plant and seedlings a while back.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    robably just my bad kuck then, I expected seed since it is so much like D. spatulata. I also found the humidity wasn't so much of an issue once the plant gets established and it did fine outdoors at 50-70 per cent average humidity. This species survived the drought that took most of my other plants, but seemed happiest in boggy conditions.

    Don't know if it's possible, but I would love to see a photo of the seed testa if anyone has one?
    "Grow More, Share More"

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •