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Thread: Warped, twisted leaves?

  1. #9
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Bugweed @ July 01 2006,1:43)]JIM! Your a scientist, not a Doctor!!!! D. hilaris isn't too common in most collections.
    "I'm a doctor... not a bricklayer?"

    D. hilaris sounds like a funny little plant.

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Osheshkers @ June 30 2006,2:55)]I moved my sundew inside, by the same windowsill my Nepenthes are thriving on.

    My sundew has new growth coming in, which so far looks okay. I'll wait for that to come in, and see if it's warped or normal. If it grows in still looking twisted, I'll submerse my plant in distilled water as Jim suggested.

    I'll update as I notice changes to the plant, or make changes!
    Mine will do this from time to time, especially if they get alot of rain on them.
    dewy
    John 3:16
    My grow list/want list
    Prior to the funeral home visit, we heard ~ "Hey'all watch this ! !"

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (jimscott @ June 30 2006,9:36)]Glad to see progress with the capensis. Is your capensis a 'typical' or was it originally a red form? I see red leaves in its oldest leaves. The one I posted is the Albino form.

    May I ask what Nepenthes you have? Is it in a hanging basket or planter or terrarium?
    I'm actually not sure if my capensis is "typical" or not.
    I got it from a friend who got it from... I don't remember where.
    Actually, I've gotten all my CPs from him, so far. He launched me into the wonderful world of CPs.

    I have three different types of Nepenthes:
    N.rafflesiana
    N.ventricosa
    N.sanguinea

    http://imagesocket.com/images/Rimg0110b66.jpg

    Left to Right in picture.
    This picture is a week old. They've grown a lot since then... A few new pitchers, etc.

    As you can see, the Neps are just in pots, which sit in cups that catch the drainage, which I periodically empty and rinse of the sitting water. They usually sit right on the windowsill, but I moved them onto the table for this picture.

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    Sadly, I just checked the new growth on my D.capensis moments ago, and I found... bugs.

    There were some green bugs, easily visible to the eye, and some white specks, which I wasn't able to make out precisely what they were.
    Sorry I don't have pictures, my parents took the camera. I should have it back tonight, and I'll see about taking some pictures.

    My plan of action:
    Soak the plant in distilled water.
    Hopefully this will solve the problem, but if it doesn't... well, we'll just wait and see.


    I'm off to find something put the plant in, to immerse it. :/

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    And the D.capensis soaks.
    If this doesn't work, my friend suggested a spray he uses.


    The bugs were identified by my mother as aphids.




    The white, fuzzy spots you see are probably just fuzz feathers from my birds, whose cage is near where the pot was sitting. At any rate, I poked them, and they didn't move. :P

    So, kids. The moral of the story is never put your CPs near roses.


    A few questions I still have, resultant of the paranoia brought on by the aphids attacking my poor little plant:
    1. Is there a preferable place to put the plant while it soaks? I.E. inside vs. outside, light spot vs. dark spot
    2. I stupidly placed the questionable plant less than a foot from my Neps. If I notice aphids on them (I haven't so far), do I treat them the same way, or should I opt for my friend's spray?*


    *I did notice a little brown beetle on the N.rafflesiana, but I think it's just a lone beetle and not a pest. I'm keeping a close eye on it.

  6. #14
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Osheshkers @ July 02 2006,10:38)]A few questions I still have, resultant of the paranoia brought on by the aphids attacking my poor little plant:
    1. Is there a preferable place to put the plant while it soaks? I.E. inside vs. outside, light spot vs. dark spot
    2. I stupidly placed the questionable plant less than a foot from my Neps. If I notice aphids on them (I haven't so far), do I treat them the same way, or should I opt for my friend's spray?*


    *I did notice a little brown beetle on the N.rafflesiana, but I think it's just a lone beetle and not a pest. I'm keeping a close eye on it.
    My condolences for the aphids. After my post, no doubt, there will be more guidance, with respect to systemis pesticides, but my take on it is to simply take whatever you have on hand that is plastic or glass, and significantly taller and of course wider to accomodate the capensis pot and plant. Then just put the pot and plant in the larger vessel and overfill it with the distilled water. People will vary as to how long to keep the plant immersed. I had one sundew in there for 2 weeks and the plant came back - but that's overkill, in more ways than one. A couple days oughta take care of the aphids. If this had been a collection of plants, drowning the aphids would probably be impractical. In that case I would recommend a pesticide. But with one plant, the simplest approach should do the trick. I never gave it any thought as to where to place the infected plant, other than being inside. so I had mine right at the window sill, which means it's still getting light.

    I would take a wait and see aproach with the Neps. Aphids, to my experience, get to every plant in one's collection.

    The way you are keeping the Neps is reminiscent of how the forum member called Pinkerton is keeping them. The only difference and suggestion is to blacken / darken the lower portion, so as to eliminate algae. Black construction paper or Sharpie or a dark container would work.

    As with anything, people have a variety of cultivation approaches and some people keep their Neps outside. At least 2 members keep theirs in hanging baskets, right in their kitchen. Myself and at least 2 others have them in bathroom window sills. I used to use hanging baskets, but i have had some bad luck with them collapsing. So now I use planters, that catch water as it drains through, which is the same concept as you are employing with yours.

    This is what they looked like a few months ago, when I had them in the attic window:



    This was when we were living in Pennsylvania, at the lab:



    Here's a cobra lily with the suspended pot / drainage approach:



    A better picture of the Neps in the planter is forthcoming. just waiting for the pictures to be Emailed to me.

  7. #15

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    D. hilaris......LOL~ This is one of the holy grails of most Drosera growers. More rare than an honest politician, and one I could never come up with, alas.
    This is D. capensis.


    I would submerge the plant for a week, not soak....put it completely under water....or you can use orthene which if diluted properly will do the job and cause no harm whatsoever.
    "Grow More, Share More"

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    After submerging my D.capensis for about 5 days in distilled water, today I removed it from its bath, aphid-less.



    Sopping wet, but looking good!

    I checked the plant over for aphids while it was soaking (poked at it with a toothpick), and checked it again today after I removed it.
    My D.capensis is now recovering on the back porch steps, far away from any roses.

    I'll keep an eye out for new growth/ return of dew, and let you know when that happens!

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