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Thread: Warped, twisted leaves?

  1. #1

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    One of my D.capensis seems to be warped, or twisted. Concerned about the welfare of my beloved plant, I bring it to you, the denizens of the terraforums.

    The "warped" capensis:


    I have another capensis I got on the same day, from the same person (they were actually in the same pot when I got them), which shows no signs of being "warped" like the other one.

    The "normal" capensis:


    So I ask:
    Is my plant suffering from some malady? Is this just a fluke? Should I be concerned?


    *Note: I'd be happy to provide clearer pictures of the "warped" capensis, as I suddenly realized the current picture might be a little unclear. Please ask if you'd like me to take new pictures.

  2. #2
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Hi Osh... and welcome to TerraForums! Do you have a magnifying glass? The plant, as I have witnessed from my own experience, when kept outside, may have picked up some aphids. What I do is submerge the plant / pot in distilled water for a couple days. The aphids drown and the plant lives. The plant also looks like "death warmed over" for awhile, but new leaves replace old ones.

    One leaf actually looks like it is bent in the position of ingesting prey. It is also possible that it just needs more light.

    This plant, at one time had aphids and also wilted from a 55 degree temperature differential. It survived.


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    Thanks for the advice, Jim.

    I checked my plant, and although I noticed some brown specks under the leaves, I don't think they're aphids. Dirt, maybe? I didn't notice anything crawling.

    Here's an updated pic:
    (Sorry for the foggy-ness. I had to hold a magnifying glass up to my camera. :/)



    I'll keep your advice in mind, Jim, and if no other solution proffers itself, I'll give it a try.

    Oh, and yes, I agree that at least one of the leaves looks as if it's digesting. I keep my plant outside, near the "normal" plant, so I think it's getting enough sun. I did notice a nearby rose casting a little bit of a shadow, though. I'm not sure. I'll investigate that further.

  4. #4
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Insect/arachnid/nematode culprits that frequently inspire this type of growth are frequently long gone by the time evidence of their presence becomes this obvious, though not always.



    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    I have to laugh because my very first digital camera was a "complimentary" Earthlink one that proved the adage about, "You get what ya paid for". I used to keep my plants at work, at an environemntal laboratory and after work I would try to take pictures of them with this horrible camera that had no macros worth a lick and even tried holding a magnifying glass between camera and subject. Then I had the fluorescent light bouncing off the glass into the camera. Now I just borrow cameras from willing friends.

    Anyways, in the newest picture I see a little bit of dew. Dew is a good sign. If this were my plant, I would take it inside and place it at a south window sill, with the pot sitting in distilled water. CP's vary widely in the conditions they do well. Some really need to be kept outside or in a greenhouse (VFT's & Sarracenias). Many do fine sitting a window sill all year long. This is one that does just fine indoors. Don't know if it's coincidence or not, but the ones that I have taken outside and have gotten aphids, all do well indoors (capensis, spatulata, adelae).I think you were alluding to the correlation between roses and aphids, but I'm not sure.

    I suggest immersing / drowning as the simplest, cheapest, and environmentally friendly solution, in contrast to using pesticides.

    Magnifying glasses are also good for seeing if seeds have germinated or new leaves or flower stalks or....

    Give the plant some time and see what happens. One thing I have learned is to not fret about existing leaves, unless the new ones come out gnarled, dewless, or just don't happen at all. Usually, new growth comes in fine.

    Keep us posted!

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    I moved my sundew inside, by the same windowsill my Nepenthes are thriving on.

    My sundew has new growth coming in, which so far looks okay. I'll wait for that to come in, and see if it's warped or normal. If it grows in still looking twisted, I'll submerse my plant in distilled water as Jim suggested.

    I'll update as I notice changes to the plant, or make changes!

  7. #7
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Glad to see progress with the capensis. Is your capensis a 'typical' or was it originally a red form? I see red leaves in its oldest leaves. The one I posted is the Albino form.

    May I ask what Nepenthes you have? Is it in a hanging basket or planter or terrarium?

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    JIM! Your a scientist, not a Doctor!!!! That plant reminds me of d. hilaris. A capensis wannabe with leaves going every which way. Like its on LSD!!! Doubt it so try the soak. If it doesn't change and stays the same for a few months or more, you may have a d. hilaris. Though I doubt it. D. hilaris isn't too common in most collections.
    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

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