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Thread: when can i repot Byblis seedlings?

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    I have a lamellata that is growing right up against the side of the pot that I need to repot. It only has about 4 leaves right now, but the stem is very thin and I'm afraid I will break it.

    I also have 3 filifolia growing in close proximity in a small pot, one is maybe 2 weeks old, another probably has about 6 leaves, and the other has about 10.
    Z polski y dumny
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    FarmerDave's Avatar
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    I'm not exacly sure but, I would try to leave them alone.

    But if you really want to move them then I would try to do it with as little root disturbance as possible

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    Dave,

    Do you have any suggestions for minimizing root disturbance when the roots are RIGHT up against the side of the pot?

    PS: I dont mind destroying the pot, but my fingers are pretty fat and dumb, and I think i would accidentally drop soil on top of the plant or something
    Z polski y dumny
    Prayer - how to do nothing and still think you're helping.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5F5aCUNE4Z8
    ^^^Newest vid

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    FarmerDave's Avatar
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    in that case it might be best if you destroy the pot(s) of byblis just in case and take more than enough soil with the plants to minimize the root disturbance, and then once they're established in their life-long pots then I would water them with only one small watering of room temperature deluted superthrive mixture to help counteract any of the possible transplant shock.

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    Moderator Cindy's Avatar
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    I've transplanted Byblis liniflora seedlings before. They were about 5/8" tall.
    Cindy

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    I've tried it before and all of them but one died of transplant shock

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    Hi,

    Byblis filifolia seedlings can easily be transplanted. Simply use a knife or something similar to scoop up the plant and surrounding soil. In my experience, they are rarely affected. Byblis lamellata is a different matter. I've transplanted both B lamellata and B gigantea seedlings before. You must, again get as much of the surrounding soil as possible- cut the pot if necessary. I'd plant the seedling in the middle of a six inch or larger pot full of peat:sanderlite. The problem is that B lamellata/gigantea seedlings tend to wilt when moved. I have found that, after transplant, they need high humidity. They will then recover if they wilt. I use the top 1/4 of a large Coke bottle. I place this over the newly transplanted seedling. After a few days, I remove the screw top from the Coke bottle, and after a few weeks, I remove the Coke bottle altogether. If, after removal of either the top or the bottle, the plant wilts, simply put it back for a few days, and it should quickly recover. Another couple of points, firstly, do not throw away the old pot- some seeds may germinate later. Secondly, moving the lamellata is a risk, but is one that you must take, unless it is already in a large (6"+) pot. Thirdly, good luck- once in past seedling stage, B gigantea & lamellata are very easy to grow. All of the following plants were moved in their infancy:

    B lamellata seedling, a few weeks after being transplanted.

    Same plant, 10 months later

    Same again.

    Some shots of the closely related B gigantea:




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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Greg.... gotta love your collection! You and Langy!

    In general, if I feel it necessary to transplant root sensitive plants, I prepare the new pot with wet media and create a depression in it. I then, as much as possible, take the seedlings / plants, with the media they are in, as one unit, and mve the whole thing to its new accommodations. The idea is to get as much below and around the roots as possible. I also top water, so as to settle the two medias, leaving no gaps.

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