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Thread: D. aliciae and black leaves from crown

  1. #17
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    I don't think this species requires a dormancy. Temps are right around 70, very stable. Lighting is ~15 hours per day, under a fluorescent light, since November. And now the next leaf opening up is perfectly normal. Go figure....

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    Meaven's Avatar
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    i'd like to get it under a microscope...

    my aliciae does the same thing.
    if i were ruler of the world, anyone who defined a nepenthene as a "companion plant" to orchids would be fired from a cannon atop mt. kinabalu.

  3. #19
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    This is something that was reported on, I believe, back in the 1970's. Here is a short description of the issue.

    The darkening of the growth point, as shown by the photographs shared here, is caused by humic acids, and perhaps other solubles, wicking up and depositing themselves, first on the hairs and stipules of the leaf primordia, eventually covering the entire surface of the growth point and leaf primordia. My experience is that this can have a damaging effect on the growing point and can supress new growth. The easiest way to reduce this is to gently provide overhead watering with warm, purified water as often as necessary to reduce this precipitate. Another solution would be to use less peat moss, since it is a strong source for the most offending compounds, though other media ingredients may also be sources. It is also affected by temperature, ambient humidity, air movement, etc.



    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  4. #20
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Great info! It makes sense because it seems to start out as darker green/brown streaks which would be the compounds wicking up the leaf structure. And as I noted before the stuff washes off.

    So gentle top watering with warm purified water will help. Changing the tray water afterwards will probably help to remove the compounds from the system too.

    This would explain why it goes away in time as either the compounds accumulate on the (eventually) dead leaves or is leached out of the potting media in time from watering.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  5. #21
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Yes, bottom watering and surface evaporation (especially during periods of lower humidity or higher ambient temperatures) would tend to concentrate these compounds near the media surface. The hypothesis is that natural rainfall and higher humidity would reduce this process. And too, if the media surface were dry, this would be a barrier to the migration of this concentrate onto the above-ground parts of the plant.



    Joseph Clemens
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  6. #22
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Joseph Clemens @ Dec. 21 2006,5:09)]This is something that was reported on, I believe, back in the 1970's. Here is a short description of the issue.

    The darkening of the growth point, as shown by the photographs shared here, is caused by humic acids, and perhaps other solubles, wicking up and depositing themselves, first on the hairs and stipules of the leaf primordia, eventually covering the entire surface of the growth point and leaf primordia. My experience is that this can have a damaging effect on the growing point and can supress new growth. The easiest way to reduce this is to gently provide overhead watering with warm, purified water as often as necessary to reduce this precipitate. Another solution would be to use less peat moss, since it is a strong source for the most offending compounds, though other media ingredients may also be sources. It is also affected by temperature, ambient humidity, air movement, etc.
    Thank you for diagnosis and solution! This and many other sundews and bladderworts are sitting in two, large plastic storage containers, open tray, and bottom watered. Never would have thunk it!

  7. #23
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Okay, I just gave my aliciae a bath. I have a "jet" syringe - it's like a hypodermic syringe but with a long thin plastic cone instead of a needle. I used that to direct a gentle stream/drops of luke warm distilled water (very precise) to the "crowns". The gunk washed off easily and the plant looks new. I let the water drain out into an individual tray and dumped it. Time will tell how the leaves will develop.

    I think I'll top water in the same manner for a week or so to help clear these compounds out. I did add some peat/sand mix a few weeks ago to fill in the sides of the pot because the soil had compacted around the sides during mailing. That's probably where the gunk came from.

    There's something to be said for flushing your peat mix well before using it.

    Thanks for the tips, Joseph.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  8. #24
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    i did the same. also repotted, only to find that the tiny little moss-leaves were hellacious icebergs of roots underneath the surface. hopefully my aliciae will be a little happier, now.

    you would have to thing this gunk would wreak havoc on dews. much like an oil spill vs photosynthesizing penguins.
    if i were ruler of the world, anyone who defined a nepenthene as a "companion plant" to orchids would be fired from a cannon atop mt. kinabalu.

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