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Thread: Are these the longest tentacles ever?

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    pingman's Avatar
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    Are these the longest tentacles ever?

    Macro close ups of Drosera sessilifolia!!


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/minicat...7594498392794/

    Peter
    Please check my website for photos:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/minicatt/sets

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    Meaven's Avatar
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    the "fingers" intrigue me. burmannii seems to have those as well. they dont produce mucilage, or not nearly as much as the other tendrils. what purpose do they serve? could it be that they are used for the absorption of nutrients?
    if i were ruler of the world, anyone who defined a nepenthene as a "companion plant" to orchids would be fired from a cannon atop mt. kinabalu.

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    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    Bingo.

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    Hi,

    i doubt, that these so called "snap tentacles" can absorp nutrients. I think, they are rather used to adhere the prey. These tentacles can move quite fast (especially in D. glanduligera, sessilifolia and burmanii) and are very long, so they are perfect for this work.

    Not only D. sessilifolia has such tentacles. Many other do also have them. The interesting thing about it is, that they look quite different in different species! It's worth taking a look at them. Siggi Hartmeyer has done some work in examinig these tentacles on different species. His results are presented on a DVD (you can buy them at him personnaly - i don't know if there is an english version).

    I took some real time video of the movement of these kind of tentacels some time ago. Here are the links:

    Drosera cuneifolia:
    http://www.utricularia.net/sonstiges/DROS81.AVI

    Drosera rubrifolia:
    http://www.utricularia.net/sonstiges/DROS83.AVI

    Drosera intermedia x capillaris:
    http://www.utricularia.net/sonstiges/DROS105.AVI

    each video is about 9MB.

    Christian

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    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
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    My understanding was that these long retentive gland curled inward to block the prey from escaping off the leaf. Not sticky, just as a barrier so they couldn’t get off the edge and escape.

    This itself is pure regurgitation, by the way
    that makes no logic

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    Always a newbie glider14's Avatar
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    i have noticed that my D. burmanni, after a feed, the long tentacles will retract but they produce the sticky stuff for maby a day or so.... they are very fast though and i think Finch is right.
    Alex
    Everything is explainable. The seemingly unexplainable is but a result of our insufficient knowledge.- Hans Brewer

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    JRFxtreme's Avatar
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    They are sticky though not as much as the regular tentacles.

    They act to keep the insect from escaping (as mentioned before) but if an insect is unlucky enough to come in contact with only the retentive gland, it will quickly be lifted to the center of the leaf.

    Sticking ants on the retentive glands is fun! Well.. not for the ant.

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    FarmerDave's Avatar
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    yes they are basically almost completely non-stick stalked glands that are used to quickly snare (in the case of really small ants) or block the escape of already captured prey, or at least from what I've observed with my plants.

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