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Thread: is D. fulva easy?

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    is D. fulva easy?

    its like the only thing for sale that i could find......

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    D. fulva is as easy (or not as easy) as the rest of the petiolaris group.
    You must be able to provide high temps for most of the year. You have to be able to deal with dormancy as well.
    I have 2 plants of it now, and both are in some stage of dormancy. The tank is heated to about 80 degrees at night and 90 plus in the day.

    Peter.
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    so they go dormant if it gets too hot?

    is dormancy a requirement?

    thanks

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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Petiolaris complex Drosera tend to go dormant during the dry season, which is winter where most of them grow in Australia. I'm not familiar with the growing range of most petiolaris complex to say if this particular species grows in dry summer month regions. I suspect not.

    So it's probably shorter photo-periods, drop in temps and rainfall that signal dormancy to these.
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    These seem to go into dormancy no matter what i do. Some though are coming out!
    Strange bunch of plants. Somewhat unpredictable.
    Something you have to live with and get use to if you want to cultivate these Drosera.
    Peter.
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    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    NotaNumber,

    The dry season, in the region that petiolaris grow in, is summer in Australia. Petiolaris complex are in active growth during the winters, which, again in the areas where Petiolaris complex grow, are warm and wet.

    While there may be a photoperiod trigger I suspect it is more to do with response to moisture. If you read any of Lowrie's literature, he notes that, by and large, the majority of plants of many of the species tend to be found in depressions or against stone faces where moisture retention is longer than the surrounding open areas. Plants found in such areas will be in active growth while another plant of the same species in a less protected but otherwise identical area are dormant.

    D. fulva is a moderatly easy plant. It is not as easy as paradoxa so do not expect windowsill growth. Probably ranks in with petiolaris or falconeri for ease though.
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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pyro View Post
    NotaNumber,

    The dry season, in the region that petiolaris grow in, is summer in Australia. Petiolaris complex are in active growth during the winters, which, again in the areas where Petiolaris complex grow, are warm and wet.

    While there may be a photoperiod trigger I suspect it is more to do with response to moisture. If you read any of Lowrie's literature, he notes that, by and large, the majority of plants of many of the species tend to be found in depressions or against stone faces where moisture retention is longer than the surrounding open areas. Plants found in such areas will be in active growth while another plant of the same species in a less protected but otherwise identical area are dormant.

    D. fulva is a moderatly easy plant. It is not as easy as paradoxa so do not expect windowsill growth. Probably ranks in with petiolaris or falconeri for ease though.


    Okay, I must have my regions wrong. I thought the petiolaris complex grows in the Northern and (mainly) Northwest Territories of Australia, the so called tropical regions. According to this article from the Australian Government, the seasons in Australia are thus:

    * Summer: December to February
    * Autumn: March to May
    * Winter: June to August
    * Spring: September to November

    Australia's tropical regions

    The tropical regions of Australia are in the north of the country. They include the central and northern parts of the Northern Territory and Queensland, and the northern parts of Western Australia. The weather in the Australian tropics has two very different seasons: the wet season and the dry season.

    The wet season lasts about six months in summer and spring, between December and March. It is hotter than the dry season, with temperatures between 30 and 50 degrees Celsius. This is because of the high humidity during the wet, which is caused by large amounts of water in the air. During the wet there is a lot of rain, which frequently causes flooding.

    The dry season lasts about six months in autumn and winter, usually between May and October. Temperatures are lower and the skies are generally clearer during the dry. The average temperature is around 20 degrees Celsius.

    The 'build up' is the humid time of year between the wet and dry seasons. It usually lasts for three or four months. Things become quite tense during the 'build up' as people sit and swelter in the humidity while waiting and hoping for the first rains to come. The humidity continues day and night with no respite, so when the rains finally do come everyone enjoys their cooling relief.


    Moisture levels is probably the most important determining factor in dormancy as supposedly this complex will continue to grow if kept wet.
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    The Far North (Kimberly) region of Western Australia appears to be the petiolaris complex growth area (between Broome and Kimberly)

    Distribution maps of Drosera petiolaris and Drosera paradoxa

    Weather averages for Broome Post Office and Kimberly Res. Station

    Broome Post Office: Latitude:-17.9500 S Longitude: 122.2500 E Elevation: 19.0 m
    Kimberly Res. Station: Latitude:-15.6547 S Longitude: 128.7092 E Elevation: 31.0 m
    Last edited by Not a Number; 02-05-2007 at 09:44 PM. Reason: more informative links on distribution
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