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Thread: Dewless D. capensis

  1. #1
    Kung Fu Fighting! NeciFiX's Avatar
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    Dewless D. capensis

    Urgh, people are talking about how their D. capensis had tons of dew and continued to have so afterwards. My lighting may not be a metal halide lamp, but my D. aliciae produced enough dew to catch a fruit fly on it's new leaves, and this plant is almost TOUCHING the light it is so close, and the D. aliciae pot was so much shorter. When I got my D. capensis, it only had a little dew on one of the tentacles, which got on me do to the fact I saw no dew and my hand accidentally rubbed onto it. Thankfully, Drosera and Ping dew isn't hard to come off.

    Conditions
    RIGHT UNDER LIGHT (Dionaea were liking it a lot, slight red colouration, constantly producing new traps, many flower stalks, D. aliciae made dew, was in a 3 inch pot, this is 8 inch)
    Humidity (45-50%, some people have had tons of dew in only 15% though)
    Watering: Every few days I flood the media, not like all the way to the rim of the pot, only slightly. The tray it is in doesn't do much for the tray system, not deep enough, not enough room to get a bigger one. None of the plants get root disturbance though as I do it slowly and it's not a full fledge flood. Distilled water only.
    Soil: 50:50 Peat Moss/Perlite.

    I've had it for maybe a month, it came from BobZ, I have a feeling it may be my lightings fine but... my D. aliciae didn't make any dew until I got new light and it made new tentacles. But this thing is FLOWERING and it has tons of new, dewless tentacles, IN FACT, the newest tentacle which is closest to the light, has red hairs, but no dew.

    So what could I be doing wrong?

    Also, it was making new dewless leaves before it flowered, so I don't think it was flower exhaustion.

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    here is sort of a counter-intuitive suggestion: back it away from the lights some. If they are hot the "dew" can evaporate. D. capensis really aren't that demanding. I admit that a lot of my sundews grow a lot better under lights, but my capensis grows just fine on the windowsill. It flowers (is currently) and has lots of dew. You may be surprised as to how much "neglect" they can take.
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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    While light is the biggest factor for the production of dew, it sounds like more than light is the issue. Could it be reacting to shock of some sort... a significant change in conditions?

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    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    More light. Put it outside once the weather permits.

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    Moderator Cindy's Avatar
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    Because I live in summer weather year round, I find that D. capensis does not dew and eventually die on me. Apparently, it dislikes being warm at the roots region and that leads to root rot very quickly. What's the temperatures under your lights?

    I find that a night temperature drop is also essential.
    Cindy

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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    You said they are flowering. Drosera often lose their dew when flowering. Both flowers and dew production require a lot of energy and the need to reproduce takes priority.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    My experience with sundew flowering has been that in rare cases the plant can look a little put out, but I can't think a one where it lost its dew. Now taking a capensis from 70 degrees to 15 degrees and back to 70 again will not only cause dew loss, but wilting of over 90% of the leaves. I have seen dewless D. adelae as Lowes "cube of death", but that was from incredible neglect from the store.

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    Kung Fu Fighting! NeciFiX's Avatar
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    Well, my D. aliciae was MUCH farther from the light and it still produced gobs of dew on it's new leaves. D. capensis was dewless for about 2-3 weeks then began to flower suddenly with still no dew.

    But, light, yeah, it's right next to it, but it could be light.

    It's in the freezing temps in the middle of April, temps begin to warm up to 50's and 60's in June, so hopefully by July I can have them outside .

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