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Thread: Newb with a Sundew

  1. #1

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    Newb with a Sundew

    I believe that I have a descent grasp on taking care of my new sundew that I found at Lowes, but I need help on two things:

    1.) How do I let it get sunlight without letting all the beads dry out

    2.) How do i feed it!!!!!! I've tried small crickets and flightless fruit flies. They don't even stick to it, they just crawl all over it like it was nothing!

    Please help!!!!!!!

  2. #2
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Lowe's sundews are usually Drosera capensis (longish flat leaves, last 3rd has tentacles), Drosera adelae (long pointy leaves) or Drosera spatulata (spoon shaped leaves). These are all sub-tropical species and you should be able to grow them outdoors at least part of the year or on a bright sunny windowsill almost anywhere in the 48 contiguous states. Drosera spatulata has temperate forms and may need/go dormant.

    To answer #1:

    a. Make sure it has plenty of water. Use rainwater or water that has been purified by distillation or reverse osmosis with not salt or other minerals added. Your local tap water maybe ok, but unless you know for sure stick with the above. Put the pot in a small tray, deep dish or other container filled with at least a quarter inch of water.
    b. Make sure the plant gets at least 3-4 hours of direct full sunlight a day.

    Given a & b and the plant is not dormant it should produce dew that does not dry out in the sun.

    Depending on what shape the plant is in when you got it, it should start producing dew in a few days. If the plant was dried out or light starved when you got it, it may not produce dew on any of the existing leaves and you have to wait for the next set of new leaves to open this might take a week or two or more. Sometimes it takes a few days for new leaves to produce dew too.

    #2

    Once the leaves are nice and dewy flightless fruit flies should get trapped easily. Crickets, except for the smallest you can buy, maybe too big or strong to get trapped. You could try putting them in the freezer for a few minutes to slow them down, not kill them, and put a cricket on the a leaf with some tweezers, working it into the dew gently.

    You might need to give the plant a little kick start by fertilizing with a small amount of powdered freeze dried blood worms. The same store where you bought your crickets or fruit flies should have the blood worms typically as food for bettas. Take a tiny pinch and crush it finely. Sprinkle the powder onto the plant then mist ever so lightly with a spray bottle.

    If the plant is outdoors, it will probably feed itself.

    See this thread.
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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Actually, I've never seen anything other than an etioltaed D. adelae. This picture has a D. adelae all the way to the left and a D. capensis all the way to the right:



    Both grow very well at window sills, open tray method. Just give them light and an inch or so of water.

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    jrod's Avatar
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    Jim, you gonna cook those guys?

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    Doing it wrong until I do it right. xvart's Avatar
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    If your leaves are looking a little brown and death-ish you could try the following: cut off the plant at the roots and then wait for tons of little baby plants to regrow in your conditions. I did this with a Lowe's dew and the little square "pot" was overflowing with large dews within 6 months. I've noticed that D. adelae regrows from roots very easily. Of course, you may not want to just hack away at your new plant.

    Welcome to Terraforums!

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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    It must be a regional thing as I've yet to see one of the Cubes of Death at Lowe's or Wal-Mart here in SoCal. Most of the time it's D. spatulata (Gubler's) once in a while it will be D. capensis (Booman's Floral) in pots with a dome or plastic bag cone.

    I'm curious to track down the nursery that puts out the cubes.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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    wicked good plants! Presto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrbonzai211 View Post
    How do I let it get sunlight without letting all the beads dry out
    the drops of liquid aren't water. sometimes new growers will spray their sundews with water, thinking that the plant needs extra humidity to form the dew. this isn't so. the drops are actually a sticky/digestive fluid that the plant produces when it's healthy. and the way to keep it healthy is to make sure the soil doesn't dry out, and that the plant gets plenty of light. it seems a little illogical, but the way to keep the beads from drying out is by letting it get lots of sunlight!
    -Emily

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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a Number View Post
    It must be a regional thing as I've yet to see one of the Cubes of Death at Lowe's or Wal-Mart here in SoCal. Most of the time it's D. spatulata (Gubler's) once in a while it will be D. capensis (Booman's Floral) in pots with a dome or plastic bag cone.

    I'm curious to track down the nursery that puts out the cubes.
    Wait, those cubes are bad!?

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