User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 9 to 12 of 12

Thread: Petiolaris Complex Dormancy?

  1. #9
    pingman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    California
    Posts
    342
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Some of the petiolaris group seem to go into dormancy whenever they want! Others normally go in the winter.
    I would assume if you can keep them hot (over 95 degrees) at all times you could probably keep them from going dormant.
    I can't keep them that hot!!
    Has anyone else been able to keep them from going dormant?
    Peter.
    Please check my website for photos:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/minicatt/sets

  2. #10

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Birmingham, UK
    Posts
    104
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've grown two D ordensis plants since March 2006 without them ever really going truly dormant. Every now and again, they start to produce progressively smaller leaves, and eventually produce very woolly leaves about 1cm long with no functioning traps. I tend to leave them in this state for a few weeks and then repot them. They then begin to grow vigorously again almost immediately. It may also be worth mentioning that, in March this year, I received a D falconeri and a D caduca in the post from Lowrie in Australia (I live in England). Both plants had dried out somewhat on their arrival. I potted them up and put them in warm, bright conditions, sitting in a little water. Both looked completely dead- all that was left of each plant was a small bulb and a few dead leaves. After a few weeks, the caduca began to grow, but the falconeri remained completely dormant for over two months. I thought it was dead, and picked at the bulb, revealing some green underneath the brown outer surface of the bulb. Within about two days, it began to grow, and has looked progressively more impressive every day since. This may have been a fluke, but I suspect that disturbing the bulb in this way may have stimulated it into growth.

    Cheers,

    Greg

  3. #11
    RL7836's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    3,252
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Pyro View Post
    Sometimes the unpotting will actually stimulate return to growth.
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Allan View Post
    This may have been a fluke, but I suspect that disturbing the bulb in this way may have stimulated it into growth.
    I had this experience w/ 2 of my D. kenneallyi's. Both were shrinking & heading toward dormancy. Since keeping petios alive thru dormancy was hit or miss for me, I decided to try & repot. This stimulated both plants and not only started them growing again but both flowered. Pics & original post are over here.

    While there are lots of threads on Petio dormancy both here & on CPUK which provide some good reading, here's one that has some info from Andreas Fleischmann that I have not seen duplicated elsewhere.
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

    *** Growlist / Wants / Offers ***
    (with Pics)

  4. #12
    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    4,844
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    As NaN mentioned, in the wild these plants have a simple annual dormancy pattern but in cultivation the pattern can be a little wacky. The oddest one I have had was a plant that cycled 3 times in the course of a year for no reason that I can figure (it was one of 4 of the same clone all grown in the same tank under the same conditions...)

    I disagree with D'Amato that these plants do not need a dormancy. I have found that the plants in this group will always go dormant at some point and they come out looking and acting much the better for it. The exception being paradoxa which has a number of forms that never seem to go dormant (my oldest plant was actually my first petiolaris complex plant, I have had it 6 years and it has not gone dormant once.)

    What Greg has described for his ordensis is the dormancy pattern for that species. Each species has a different pattern and it can be tricky to catch it if you do not know what to look for. On a broad basis the reduction in leaf size and the loss of traps are good indicators. An increase in the amount of "hair" can also signal dormancy but not always (I have a lanata that only gets fuzzy when it breaks dormancy for example.)
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

    See You Space Cowboy

    actagggcagtgatatcccattggtacatggcaaattagcctcatgat
    Hagerstown, Maryland

    --
    actagggcagtgatatcccattggtacatggcaaattagcctcatgat

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •