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Thread: D. rotundifolia in Atlanta

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    D. rotundifolia in Atlanta

    I am located in metro Atlanta and have found D. rotundifolia impossible to grow. I got plants descended from a population in massachussets (assuming they were more heat-tolerant than the pacific northwest-derived plants). In fear of them growing during the fairly mild Georgia winter, I overwintered the plants in the freezer and planted them in the bog garden in late March. The plants broke dormancy literally within 3 days. The plants had full rosettes in two weeks and were flowering in 1 month. Unfortunately, the plants shrunk and died by early June. I think that If I could get plants descended from New Jersey or Southern Japan, I would be more sucessful. There is a natural population about 2hrs north of where I live, however, plants descended from the Georgia mountain population are virtually nonexistant in nursery trade. Has anyone had luck with D. rotundifolia in a climate with hot summers?

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    A yellow M&M Jefforever's Avatar
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    I sure haven't.

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    Slurm,

    I am a bit surprised about your issues. First of all, I wouldn't overwinter in a freezer... that is a bit excessive I think. If D. filiformis and S. purpurpea ssp purpurpea can take it here in ATL then rotunifolia sure should be able to. Actually, from secret inside sources, I have come to find out that over at the Atlanta Botanical Garden, their bog has their fair share of this plant. In my opinion, I would plant them in your bog garden in the spring, or better yet just order some seeds and sow them in the winter time, then let them germinate. They should drop into dormancy even in our winter ok.

    If not, there is always D. capillaris that grows just fine here.
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    I have contacted the ABG about this. All of their rotundifolia plants are descended from plants grown from seeds collected in the northeast GA mountains. To my knowledge, the ABG is the only location where native georgia rotundifolia stock exists in cultivation. The only D. rotundifolia plants I can find for sale are derived from new england or pacific northwest populations, which can't take the Atlanta heat. I overwintered my plants in the freezer because they were descended from a population in Franklin Co. Massachussets. Franklin Co. is in central massachusetts, and should have much colder winters than coastal areas. The freezer idea may have been a bit excessive, but I remeber reading that certain cold-temperate CP's (such as P.vulgaris, D.arcturi etc) should be overwintered in the freezer where winter temps are too warm. I will be doing a high-school internship at the ABG later this year. I know some people there, so if I am lucky, I may get seeds or cuttings from some of their rotundifolia plants.

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    A yellow M&M Jefforever's Avatar
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    I remember hearing of an extremely rare New Guinea form of Rotundifolia...I can't find it anywhere though

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    I heard about that too. I don't think it is in cultivation. Even though it is "technically" tropical, it only lives at insanely high elevations on Doorman's top. It would most likely require conditions similar to N. villosa or even colder. I wonder how it got there. My theory is that the New Guinea population is a leftover from the ice age glaciations. D. rotundifolia grows on 4 continents (North America, Europe, Asia, and beleive it or not in Africa at high elevations in Morocco). Because of the temp difference during the ice age, it is possible that D. rotundifolia existed in much of southeast Asia. When temps got warmer, it is likely that it became "stranded" at very high elevations. I would not be surprised if D.rotundifolia was found on other equitorial mountains.

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    The NG rotundifolia may be in cultivation, it was in TC at one time and the person who put it in TC may have flasks still though no one has been able to get in touch with them about it.

    Slurm, who at ABG did you talk to? While I do not doubt that they have stock native to GA I also know that they have the plant popping up as sports from old WI sphag that is occasionally used. So all the rotundifolia there are probably not GA type material. And it has been a long time but IIRC they have trouble with it growing as well because the winters are just too mild for them...
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    If I can get my hands on some southern appalachian D.rotundifolia plants I will probably try growing them partially submerged in cold water like Darlingtonia. I saw photos of their natural habitat in GA and they live on rocks at the edges of fast-moving mountain streams. I think cool roots may be the key to keeping this plant alive if temps rise to high.

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