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Thread: Is this petiolaris dormancy?

  1. #9

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    Does neam work ?
    Or do yo need to do systematic insectacide ?
    I have never had pest problems yet.

  2. #10
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Thanks for the links. Looking at a few of the pictures, I don't think I've ever seen the adult pest, but perhaps their effects.

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    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    The adults are near invisible. I have dealt with them on rare occasion and they are a pain. Do not know if neem works or not. I use a systemic on principle, if they are eating the plant then I know they will get poisoned.
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

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  4. #12
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Re: Neem Oil (from the UCD webpage):

    Narrow-range oil (Sunspray, Volck), azadirachtin (Safer BioNeem), neem oil (Green Light Garden Safe), pyrethrins combined with piperonyl butoxide (Garden Safe Brand Multi-purpose Garden Insect Killer, Spectracide Garden Insect Killer), and (at least for greenhouse thrips) insecticidal soaps (Safer), can be somewhat effective for temporary reduction of thrips populations if applied when thrips are present and damage first appears. These materials have the benefit of allowing at least a portion of the natural enemy populations to survive because they do not leave toxic residues. Sprays must be applied to thoroughly cover susceptible plant tissue, such as new leaf growth and buds. On plants with a history of severe, unacceptable damage, begin treatment early when thrips or their damage is first observed. Repeat applications (usually 5 to 10 days apart, depending on temperature) are usually required because these insecticides only kill newly hatched thrips and recently emerged adults.

    Refer to the "Chemicals" section of the UCD page for more information on pesticide usage. Thrips are a difficult pest to control as they lay their eggs and pupate within the plant tissue itself, thus most chemical controls will kill only the adults.

  5. #13

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    Okay so thripes are a very nasty insect,so if I get them I don't want to mess around I should use a systematic.

  6. #14

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    I've been spraying the insecticide daily and rinsing it off after half an hour. I've seen a good number of dead thrips floating off in the media too. It's nasty stuff. And the sun dews look like drowned half dead rats now.

    The rest of them appear to be aphid infested. Falconeri are not an easy bunch

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    RL7836's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by b.t. View Post
    I've been spraying the insecticide daily and rinsing it off after half an hour.
    Just curious if this agrees w/ label instructions? Most of the systemics with which I'm familiar have you apply the pesticide and maybe reapply in 2 weeks or so (for the ones that were missed & young from hatched eggs). If it's systemic, the bugs will die when they munch on the plant again (as Pyro mentioned above) - no need for all the reapplications. Continually re-applying a pesticide that isn't meant for daily applications will likely end in dead plants.

    Quote Originally Posted by b.t. View Post
    I've seen a good number of dead thrips floating off in the media too.
    I'd be suspicious if you're seeing thrips. If they're the bugs from your other thread, they're aphids. As Pyro mentioned, thrips are difficult to actually see.

    Quote Originally Posted by b.t. View Post
    The rest of them appear to be aphid infested. Falconeri are not an easy bunch
    Falconeri tend to do better when they do not have an infestation of plant juice suckers.... there aren't alot of plants that will thrive with all those critters around....
    All the best,
    Ron
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