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Thread: Is this petiolaris dormancy?

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    Is this petiolaris dormancy?

    I've read up on the inward spiral that shows a plant is going dormant. However, I got these in August and I havent had enough leaves to even tell where is the spiral right now. They're just doing poorly, less dewy than before, and in general I'm unsure if its time to start reducing the water and hope they wake up in a month or two.

    These are the kenayelli and falconeri x paradoxa I believe. Although the falconeri paradoxa is so badly mangled that I cant tell if it is a falconeri or a hybrid




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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    They look more than just dormant.

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    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    They have thrips. Spray them and keep them isolated form your other plants.
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

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    I have been trying to scrape them off with a tooth pick because the last two times I had scale and mealy bug problems i lost the plants when I tried insecticide treatment.

    If the scraping isnt enough can I also soak the plant underwater for a day or two? I read that works on mealys. I'm just not very comfortable with insecticide at this point having lost plants to the insecticide, than the pest.

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    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    Scraping won't work for thrips as they are actually inside the leaf.

    If you do not want to use insecticide then yes you can submerge. I would go at least a week and if you can set it up so the plant still gets light and try to keep the water warmish.
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

    See You Space Cowboy

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    On rare occasion, I have seen that look, and never notced anything but general suffering and death. What exactly characterizes thrip infestation?

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    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    It is most obvious on the kenneallyi. That burned look to the leaves is where the thrips have consumed the inner tissue.
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

    See You Space Cowboy

    actagggcagtgatatcccattggtacatggcaaattagcctcatgat
    Hagerstown, Maryland

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    actagggcagtgatatcccattggtacatggcaaattagcctcatgat

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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Jim: It depends on the species of thrips and the host plant. Usually there is leaf deformaties as seen with other suckers (aphids, scale, etc.). One common sympton are silvery streaks or scars as one species chews the tissue before sucking the fluids.

    See tables 1 and 2 and the "Damage" section:
    http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7429.html

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