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Thread: D. arcturi Cultivation

  1. #1
    A yellow M&M Jefforever's Avatar
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    D. arcturi Cultivation

    Hi all,

    I am planning to recieve some D. arcturi material in a week or two. The thing I'm most worried about is the dormancy. I've been researching, and here's what I have so far:

    D. arcturi

    Altitude: 1400m - 1080m to sea level.
    Not self pollinating; need to pollinate.
    Grow on banks of streams.
    Soil:
    - Organic: “Deep sphagnum beds”, wet sandy clay soil, “Damp peat”, “sedge peat”, pure LFS
    - Inorganic: pure gravel, could put dead sphagnum an inch or two underneath for humidity.
    - Plants growing in gravel have their rhizome above ground. Plants in organic mixes have rhizome just below ground level, shallowly buried.

    D. arcturi produces a rhizome up to 15cm long. With every year of age, the plant’s rhizome grows 1cm.
    Weather: Cloudy, humid, moist winds
    Dormancy: Dormant from October to April/May - light frosts?

    I have no more clue about dormancy, a phase which is incredibly important for this species. Any more advice would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks!!

    - Jeff
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 01-21-2008 at 06:44 PM.

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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Unless you have the "Giant" variety from near the coastal region you have your work cut out for you. The "Giant" is going to be elevated to species status from what Ivan Snyder tells me.

    The "typical" D. arcturi has a reputation along with Drosera linearis of being well nigh impossible to cultivate long term. It requires alpine conditions. Light frost for dormancy? Try overwintering under snow. You have to remember the mountain regions in New Zealand these are found are between roughly latitudes 42S through 49S - roughly equivalent to between New York and Quebec (42N to 49N).

    Even the "Giant" will get snowed under as they are from the southern end of New Zealand.

    Strangely enough the northern latitudes are about the distribution range of Drosera linearis.

    http://homepages.woosh.co.nz/brianqu...raarcturi.html

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    Maybe in a small mini fridge set to 28 F

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    RL7836's Avatar
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    Good luck. From my meager experience and from what I read, this plant is similar to D. linearis in difficulty....
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

    *** Growlist / Wants / Offers ***
    (with Pics)

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    Kinabalufan's Avatar
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    Hi Im a newby so excuse my ignorance
    but I have seen arcturii in the wild (lots) in grows in bogs above treeline so gets snow and also goes dormant after flowering and setting seed. New zealand never gets very cold -15 is extremly unusual so comparing latitudes is a mistake as we have ocean on all sides
    I have grown it from seed and left it outside where it got light frost (about -6 degrees C) and the seedlings came up again well
    I keep it in a cool greenhouse (a lot of glass taken out and the roof painted on half the panes it still gets to 25 degrees C but the seedlings are still alive. Im not sure what to do now as there are hundreds (well lots anyway) of seedlings and I am not good at getting drosera to survive if I prick them out. By the way I mostly use the cool house as an alpine house to grow difficult alpine plants.
    I hope that helps slightly
    Ross

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Hi Ross.... and welcome to TF! You and a young lady come from NZ and she also about to receive a D. arcturi. Do you know each other?

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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Welcome to TF Ross. We have NZ CPer who visited Los Angeles a couple years ago and was made an honorary member of the LACPS. He sends us seeds about once a year, including Drosera arcturi.

    A slew of questions:

    What are the native bogs that D. arcturi grow in like? Mostly Sphagnum, somewhat sandy or very sandy?

    What are daily temperature drops like for both the mountainous and coastal sea-level populations?

    How extensive are the roots? > 10cm or less?

    Do you have close-up photos of the hibernacula these form?

    How quickly do they grow? What is the average size at the end of first year of growth?

    What is the light quality? Mostly sunny or mostly cloudy/overcast?

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    Kinabalufan's Avatar
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    Lol I dont know a young lady from New Zealand who grows CP's its quite a big place
    Not a number good questions I wish I could answer them all.
    They grow in spahnum bogs or on peat type soils I would not have though they were very sandy when im next in the mountains I will try and take some photos I will go and take a photo of my arctuarii seedlings they are pretty sow I think mine are two years old and not very big. The light can be very bright but also cloudy the weather in the mountains is extremly chanagable they can experiance frost any day of the year, snow also, it rains evenly through out the year (except in winter when I guess it snows instead of rains) its not like some countries where there is a dry season. They seem to take reasonably hot temps as I have kept seedlings in a glasshouse. I will try and find out more.

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