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Thread: Drosera Capensis help!

  1. #17
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Drosera adelae

    Have you checked for pests like aphids, spider mites or mealy bugs? These can cause similar damage too.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  2. #18
    phoenixca7's Avatar
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    Thanks for identifying the other drosera!

    I don't see any aphids..... would spider mites and mealy bugs be visible? or would they be in the soil out of sight?

    Would it help to re-pot?

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    mark.ca's Avatar
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    well, your light is one of the problems...the sundews look like they can use more light
    Best regards,
    Marius

    My Website: http://droseragemmae.com/

  4. #20
    phoenixca7's Avatar
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    would 2 fluorescent bulbs be enough in a terrarium? i just took out the blacklight bulb and put in a regular plant bulb. or would they do better outside?

  5. #21
    ilbasso's Avatar
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    They look rather light starved, but I could be wrong.

    By the way, you have your pitcher plants flip-flopped. The third pic is your nepenthes (looks like N. ventrata?) and the fourth pic is a very distressed sarracenia (a Scarlet Belle perhaps?). I think that the sarracenia needs some good sun-bathing to perk it up.

    A nice start at a collection-good variety. I don't see why any of these can't pull through.

  6. #22
    phoenixca7's Avatar
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    Thanks for the correction! I did indeed flip-flop them.

    I am in the process of getting the patio ready for them to be outside. I hope they do better there.

    Are there any CPs that work better in a terrarium?

  7. #23
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Spider mites are tiny and difficult to spot unless there is a massive infestation. They're about the size of the period on your screen. Thyy like the undersides of leaves. One way to check for spider mites is to put a small sheet of white paper under a leaf or two and tap the leaf sharply a couple times taking care not to damage the leaf. Then examine the paper under good light. If you see tiny specks moving around you probably have spider mites. A good magnifier will help.

    Mealy bugs are much larger maybe 1/8-1/4 inch white fluffy critters. In bad infestations the females will make coverings that look like a thin layer of cotton. They'll move after being disturbed so sometimes it's hard to spot them when there is only a few at first.

    Put your plants outdoors. I'm not into Nepenthes so I can't tell you what's best for that.

    The terrarium I would use for tropical species - low land Nepenthes and tropical Drosera like wooly sundews (Petiolaris complex). You'd should improve your lighting though.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  8. #24
    Interesting Specimen Roarbark's Avatar
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    sounds like everything you have should be able to survive fairly well outside, though the N. Ventrata and possibly the D. Adelae might need the humidity of your terrarium (if its dry where you are.)

    I think that its mostly a sun issue.

    "If people sat outside and looked at the stars each night, I'll bet they'd live a lot differently." –Bill Watterson
    "Humankind is a man standing atop a pyramid while slowly chipping away at its foundation. " -Me

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