User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 13

Thread: A few TC photos

  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    184
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    A few TC photos

    Here I would like to share some photos of interesting sundews!

    Paradoxa:
    Standard rosette type, and stem forming type
    Left: D.paradoxa “type form, plants to 15 cm tall, traps pale red” Lady Dreaming Creek, c. 5 km east of Goomadeer River, c. 8 km SE of Gumadeer, Arhnemland, Northern Territory
    Right: D.paradoxa “white to pink flowers” Mount Bomford, Kimberley, Western Australia


    Spatulata tamlin trying its best to be a christmas tree


    D. Ordensis Green and Ordensis Red
    D.ordensis “leafy basal rosettes densely covered with white hairs > 12 cm Ø, with beautiful blood red traps, crowded many fflowered scapes > 40 cm tall, flowers pink” 21 km east of Kununurra, Kimberley


    Drosera gigantea flowering in tc


    D. Binata small variety


    D. Falconeri Red / D. Falconeri green
    D.falconeri “pink flower” Palmerston, N.T.

  2. #2
    Ive got Crabs! NaRnAr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Lakewood, CO
    Posts
    196
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Very cool! Ive been looking at all of your pics of them growing in TC and have a question(s) for you...

    Do you keep them in there for the life of the plant or can you take them out of the TC and plant them in a substrate?

    Are they self watering or does the TC provide all of the needed moisture since its a closed environment?

  3. #3
    Alien1099's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ USA
    Posts
    207
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by NaRnAr View Post
    Very cool! Ive been looking at all of your pics of them growing in TC and have a question(s) for you...

    Do you keep them in there for the life of the plant or can you take them out of the TC and plant them in a substrate?

    Are they self watering or does the TC provide all of the needed moisture since its a closed environment?
    When they are ready, you remove them from tissue culture and plant them in your media of choice.

    The TC jelly provides the water/nutrients they need (I believe it's loaded with hormones to encourage growth?).

  4. #4
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    How does one go from TC to normal cultivation?

  5. #5
    Moderator Cindy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    2,435
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    b.t.,

    D.paradoxa “type form, plants to 15 cm tall, traps pale red”
    - into individual containers with more agar or harden them. They are growing roots into the media.

    D. spatulata "tamlin", D. binata
    - split the clump

    D. Ordensis Green and Ordensis Red, D. Falconeri Red / D. Falconeri green
    - into their own individual containers

    I can understand your need to perhaps save space/agar/containers but you might start having problems when one of the plants inside starts turning brown and affecting the others.
    Cindy

  6. #6

    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    184
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Cool your jets, Cindy. If only you knew how busy I am and how badly neglected a lot of my tissue culture stuff is. The roots of these plants are highly bad yet. With Byblis, I have more roots than agar in my flasks! It's really up a big spaghetti mess down there. And with clumps, binata multifida looks like green brussels sprouts! Boatloads of it, all over the shop. In fact, I think even brussels sprouts aren't this dense! It looks like a clump of dodder!

    But, I will definitely get around to doing something about them. I still have this really funky dream that I might keep some of these plants in tissue culture long enough to, let's say for example witness, a northiana producing mature pitchers in tissue culture! Or heliamphora nutas producing mature pitchers in tissue culture. Wouldn't that be nice? Because the tissue culture makes the environment so stable, if I actually get that far, could actually bring the northiana to office and set it down on my worktable. That sounds really nice! Assuming that I actually manage to get it to produce mature pitchers. I haven't yet seen any nepenthes producing mature pitchers in tissue culture. I wonder why.

    Jim, removing tissue culture plants and putting them in plain media is relatively simple after you have practiced it a few times. Open the flask, take out the plant, wash all the agar off, insert into your typical substrate. Cover it with a clear back or container and proceed to slowly remove this container or bag over the process of two weeks. That's it. The trick is to slowly drop the humidity levels to the environment instead of doing it overnight by opening the jar. For me, the easiest way I have found, is to plant everything into an aquarium, and cover the aquarium and leave the top two holes which I normally meant for you to run the oxygen tubes into the aquarium. After two weeks, they seem quite settled inside of the aquarium, then I slowly start removing the cover, twisting it in a clockwise position until it is perpendicular to the tank. At this point cover comes off and I'm done.

  7. #7
    Moderator Cindy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    2,435
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Wouldn't that be nice?
    Hey! Sounds like that Cadbury advertisement we have at home...where everything is made of chocolate and can be eaten...including the gear stick! Ah, but I digress...

    You haven't seen mature plants in TC simply because they probably don't mature in TC. How large a jar do you expect to grow your mature northiana in? The size of your office table? Until a certain point, the TC plants need to be deflasked or re-plated. It is not realistic to keep them germ/bacteria/virus free and try to get them growing. It is like us being overly-protective and worrying of exposing the children to bacteria and stuff. In the end, a young child is sickly because as a toddler, he/she didn't build up the immunity as he/she should have.

    Now, get back to your TC work and stop reading the posts here.
    Cindy

  8. #8
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    But how do you transition TC plants to normal growing conditions?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •