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Thread: D. binata and drainage

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    agentrdy's Avatar
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    D. binata and drainage

    The only option for growing D. binata I have is in a relatively small undrained container on a windowsill. I'd like to know how rot-prone the plant is and an approximate water level for the plant (container depth is about 6 inches). I will be unable to use the tray method and would like the best recommendations possible for a less-than-ideal growing situation. Thanks!

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    A yellow M&M Jefforever's Avatar
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    They will never rot... unless you somehow damage the tissues. I find they only rot in extreme heat. I used to grow hundreds in undrained containers. It's the best way to go; flooded LFS.

    Have fun!

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    ive got mine in an undrained mini bog.......never had an issue with them........
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    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    If you're worried about rot, put a wide drinking straw in the pot before filling it with soil. You can then change the water by siphoning it out of the straw with a length of narrow aquarium tubing. Like the others say, though, it probably won't be an issue, at least for several years. I gave a pot of D. binata to a friend, potted in straight peat (maybe a little LFS) in a large yogurt container. Three years or so of (relatively soft) tap water later, the plant is only just beginning to decline, and the soil is probably pretty rank and rotten. D. binata is a very hardy plant.
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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    This is a very tolerant species. I've got some in typical drained pots and others in a deep bucket.

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    agentrdy's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the replies everyone; I appreciate the reassurance. I had one plant in the container I mentioned above on my windowsill and it declined very quickly. If it wasn't drowned, then I suspect the problem is exactly the same as my D. adelae, and that is Green Fairy Moss (Azolla spp.). They fix nitrogen and must have poisoned my plants because the yogurt cups with the moss all died, while ones without it were fine, and it happened to two separate species. I've since planted my adelaes into fresh media after rinsing the roots and they appear to be recovering, although one of the binatas is black and mushy as can be.

    Just as a warning, never let this stuff get into your pots--hard to pick it out, not to mention dangerous over a remarkably short time span.

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