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Thread: Huge pic thread (DUW)

  1. #17

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    Fantastic! Great to see these rarities doing sooo fine. I especially like the Drosophyllum!
    "Grow More, Share More"

  2. #18
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    I love that D. browniana; I don't think I've ever seen those before. It's like a Drosera pretending to be a Ping. I'd like to grow one of those next to a P. gypsicola to see if I could confuse people about which genus is which.
    Also, what is DUW? Download at Ur own Wrisk? Driving Under Wisconsin? Don't Usher Warnings?
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

  3. #19
    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    at first glance I thought you had Asparagus growing in your D. gigantea pot. lol
    Yeah it is funny like that. Takes them a while to get past the asparagus stage

    Do all tubers climb like that?
    No they don't all climb, about half do.

    do you grow D. hamiltonii the same as a Ceph, watering and everything?
    Not quite, I grow it a little wetter than I grow my Cephs

    Which one would you say is the most difficult to grow?
    Well that is sort of a "trick question" type thing. Once you know how to properly grow tuberous they are not too terribly difficult. However, learning how to properly grow is difficult for some people. If you want to grow tuberous I highly recommend you start with one of the easier, more forgiving species like D. peltata

    I love that D. browniana; I don't think I've ever seen those before.
    It is a nice species. Related to D. macrophylla . Somewhat rare, not for the beginner.

    Also, what is DUW?
    Dial Up Warning
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

    See You Space Cowboy

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  4. #20
    Californian in DC DrWurm's Avatar
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    Nice collection pyro. Your 4th unknown looks a lot like my D. huegelii (pics to follow). Could be macrantha too... in fact, probably more likely it's that than huegelii. Yours doesn't have the particularly bell shaped leaves
    1st might be some sort of erythrorhiza


  5. #21
    Your one and only pest! Ant's Avatar
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    cool! What does a gigantea look like after its asparagus phase?

  6. #22
    Californian in DC DrWurm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ant View Post
    cool! What does a gigantea look like after its asparagus phase?
    http://www.sarracenia.com/photos/drosera/dgiga02.jpg

    gigantic

  7. #23

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    This species is a climber. Dr. Robert Gibson sent me a photo of him standing next to a large shrub which was well over his head, and the flowering apex of the plant was a good armspan above that creeping upwards through the bush. He told me he could stub his toe on the base. Probably wouldn't happen in cultivation, but well grown examples dwarf most other tuberous species. The trick is to provide much light so the next seasons tuber is larger than the previous season, otherwise the plants stay small forever and ever or wane away entirely. To get a really large plant takes intense sunlight I believe, possible maybe in the sunny states like California and Arizona but sadly impossible here in upstate NY to get a monster plant where we get about 45 per cent of the possible sunlight. Still, they are still fun to grow and fascinating plants, as Travis has shown in his photos, and they do establish over time with attention to dormancy.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  8. #24
    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    Hey Wurm,

    I think the first and second unknowns are tubestylus or related. The third and fifth I suspect are erythro. 4 may be macranta, may be a menziesii form. I suspect 7 (and 8) to be a macrantha and 9 (and 10) have been postulated by Sean Spence of being menziesii ssp. thysanosepala. 6 is the big question mark, I got it as a tuber and the label on the pot says it is rupicola which is in the stolonifera complex and that plant sure does not look stolonifera like...

    Probably wouldn't happen in cultivation, but well grown examples dwarf most other tuberous species. The trick is to provide much light so the next seasons tuber is larger than the previous season, otherwise the plants stay small forever and ever or wane away entirely. To get a really large plant takes intense sunlight I believe, possible maybe in the sunny states like California and Arizona
    Another thing you need for a monster sized plant is a deep pot. Once upon a time in my readings I saw that the tubers for this species can go down more than a meter and get as large as a chicken egg. My plant was a tad over 45cm last year, the tuber reformed at the bottom of a 1G pot. This year I have them in a 40cm deep taproot pot. I suspect they will outgrow it in no time. My next plan, when that happens, is to just cut the bottom out of the taproot pot and sink it a couple inches into a 5G bucket full of media. If it outgrows that then I'll be screwed.
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

    See You Space Cowboy

    actagggcagtgatatcccattggtacatggcaaattagcctcatgat
    Hagerstown, Maryland

    --
    actagggcagtgatatcccattggtacatggcaaattagcctcatgat

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