User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 17 to 24 of 47

Thread: Drosera graomogolensis

  1. #17
    klasac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Myjava Slovakia
    Posts
    288
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Wow Crystal your plants look beautiful too! So if I understand your method correctly...you place the root cuttings in a ziplock bag filled with LSM and when you see initial growth then you lay the roots on the sphagnum? How much light and what temps do you give them in ziplock stage?
    I gave my plants just about anything they could supposedly need so now I will just wait if it is going to be 2 beautiful plants or 2 ugly plants chopped up and me praying over the leftovers to see some new plants:-)
    THANK YOU EVERYBODY! :-)

  2. #18
    What is and what should never be Crissytal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,149
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the compliment .

    The root cuttings are on the same rack and shelf that the mother plants and plantlets are on, so the temps are the same. I currently have two four foot long shop lights over them. They hold two 36 watt bulbs a piece for a total of four bulbs. The bulbs are the cheapest ones you can get, cool whites. The only thing special I did was line the bottom of the light fixtures with mylar to help reflect the light downward. The bag with the root cuttings are laid on top of another pot making it about six inches from the bulbs. When I start to see sprouts, I move them to live LFS. I make sure I put the LFS all around and on top of the sprouted root to prevent it from drying out. I do my best not to cover the sprouts though, they need light. I also had a cover over them for awhile to help them adjust from the high humidity in the bag to my low humidity. Yep, it's that easy, just throw them in a bag with some LFS and seal it up. That's it. Good luck klasac. I hope they recover for you!

    Crystal
    Where do we go when we just don't know,
    And how do we relight the flame when it's cold?
    Why do we dream when our thoughts mean nothing,
    And when will we learn to control?
    --Godsmack

  3. #19

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Tamlin has a lot to say regarding the "rarity" of this wonderful Brasilian endemic. Rarity is part of an age old mechanism called "supply and demand". Demand encourages higher pricing for those who would have. In this case, this species is neither overly difficult or requires a lot of growing investment.
    From the first collections of seed made available by exploring botanists in the 80's and 90's the species found it's way into private grower's collection through various recipients of the seed brought back from academic exploration of the Tepui's. Since the plants have a value to collectors , capitalism reared its usual ugly head, and the plants were controlled in their distribution to maximize their monetary value. The goal here was making money, and it has been argued also as a means to recoup some of the funds spent on an expensive expidition, or to enable other botanists to continue with their research aided by the funds from such resale. All very noble, BUT there was another alternative which I have preached over the years and herewith present yet again!
    First off, repeated collecting of this sort of material is harmful to the populations wherever it occurrs.....Brazil, Australia, South Africa. Initial collections are to be encouraged always simply because habitat attrition is inevitable in the fragile ecosystems where these plants grow.
    Once an initial collection is made, a WIDE distribution should be sought for this material, and subsequent collection should be regarded as unethical, no matter how noble the end goals. A wide distribution into numerous private collections would insure that the species may continue into the future even if the native populations fail.
    Unfortunately for the merchants, if the supply increases those 50.00 dollah sundews ain't a gonna be selling on Ebay.
    The trick then is to popularize the plants, and exert a restraint on the distribution. In effect, create a cartel. Then, foster an air of the "elite" growers of these rare plants not deserved by the common grower, and a reluctance to share outside the club walls. I heard that one major distributor requires a signed affadavit forbidding redistribution from plants he sells.
    I know of one population in SA that went extinct other than the guy who had it growing (once) and let the seed rot away before sending the worthless disappointments away as a gesture of his nobility. Oh, he lost that species in cultivation so it's gone now.
    Sad fact is, unless the plants do find wide distribution into private collections (like you and me bub) all the placements in botanical gardens are not going to make this material available for your great great grandaughters delight. Private growers are like an individual
    organism with a thousand giving hands that share. Individual hands may die off, and they do. They get married, go to college, lose interest, get sick and go broke. The beauty is, like ripples across the gulf og time, their generosity will bring what we cherished to another AGE and most pertinently to grower's in the here and now. See, you can't put seed into a time capsule for a hundred years. You need a crop of growers to grow the plants and share the seeds.
    I am all for sharing, and have encouraged selfless sharing. This means, you give freely to the community without regard for compensation. You need not be concerned with compensation, because it WILL come. You open your heart and give and you'll find the world cannot do enough for you. Isn't that beautiful, and isn't it wonderful to be a part of something so good?
    I have never been a capitalist, although it's almost an inherited trait in the USA. I don't believe money makes the world go round, that job goes to love. When you have so many like souls that share a love, like we have with our CP, the opportunity to do good and great things follows hand in hand.
    When you share freely, you give more than the gift. You prove the world is NOT the stinking cess pit that so many make of it, and HOPE is the name of that seed. My dears, YOU probably have that seed already in your fridge waiting for the right trade. For the cost of a stamp you can plant it in the collection and spirit of a friend you maybe didn't even know you had.
    Thank you for hearing the lecture, and I hope I have answered that "why is it so rare" question satisfactorily.
    "Grow More, Share More"

  4. #20

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My Lord, is that guy long winded or what

    My experiences with this species brings me joy. I managed to get some wild collected seed from a very kind and generous gentleman from Brazil (thanks Vitor) who was involved in cytological studies of CP. At the time I was working with the Senior Seed Analyst of the Michigan State Herbarium assing to produce a digital library of seed photos. I needed wild collected seed for the project and wrote to as many internet mentions of this species that I could find and pretty much blown off by all. I even offered to RENT the flaming seed, hahahaha but it was a no go. Happily, sympathetic interests that will forever be nameless allowed me to obtain the other needed samples as well but it was like walking over glass barefoot to find it. I wept when it arrived. Two weeks earlier it had been in a scape deep in the rainforest on top of a needle of rock sticking up into the clouds, and utterly forbidden to me. That, my friends, is the power of love.

    I always use pure live milled sphagnum for all the Brasillian species for its antifungal and antibacterial qualities. Seed germinated with more stubborness than other species, so I assume fresh seed is particularly desirable. I found early nutrition to be advantageous, but necessitated removal of the spent particles as these babies were terrarium grown. This species I found very susceptible to fungal blight and I lost several plants to it so removal of dinner was important. It also resents the cold as well as hot nights. The plant grows quickly, for me flowering within a season, but I had no seed from my pollination efforts despite several attempts. Dang.
    Plants were rack grown cold months in 45-90 per cent humidity, under twin shoplight fixtures, 8 tubes total, 6 inches from the tubes sitting in constant tray water 3 cm. Water was pure rain ONLY. PLants were top syringed avoiding the leaves every couple of weeks, or when temos were in the 80's in the morning. The Tepui's are pristine beyond imagining and plants seem to succumb to mineralization quickly. Main considerations are to provide a night time drop in temp's at least 5 degrees, and to keep things pure.

    I've had totally huge plants flower, prosper and then wilt overnight. I dunno. I didn't manage to keep this one long term and it still amazes me it could go pfft so fast. I strongly advise that leafcuttings be taken IMMEDIATELY, which is always good advise but esp. so in this case. Oh yeah, I also had plants that broke every one of my own growing "rules".
    Never did root cuts, and would be a little nervous as the Brasilian's have a rep for not appreciating root disturbance. They have long roots, so as deep a pot as possible. They also like cool seeping down there, so on hot days I used water kept in the fridge and syringed as called for. If the nights were over 80, plants were put in the cool cellar. OK, so there's work involved, lol, but that nightime drop is very important and not always easy to produce.

    Plants were put outside and gradualy acclimated to those conditions when DT/NT temps were 50F and above in full sun. Feeding was au naturale, but they are hungry plants! In full sun they turn beet red. Probably the deepest madder red of any Drosera species.

    In summary, not a beginner plant, and IMO not really suited to terrarium culture which will keep them alive but not happy. Well worth any effort, that's for sure!!! If you grow Drosera montana tomentosa you likely can grow this one too!
    "Grow More, Share More"

  5. #21
    klasac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Myjava Slovakia
    Posts
    288
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi Tamlin!
    What I just read from you is interesting but sad. I agree with you about the greed and mamon of some growers propelling their interest in CPs instead of pure joy of growing the plants and spreading them to other people who share their obsession.
    I have to say though I haven't encountered such a problem (at least not here in Europe). I am not talking about some european nurseries charging ungodly money for a single rarer plant. I am talking about regular individuals who I take for very helpful and unselfish people. For example I swapped my graomogolensis droseras together with affinis anglica and collinsiae for just one single adult plant of Heliamphora minor! He needed well grown heli and I wanted grao mogol sundew. If his Heli dies he gets another one for free....the same goes for me...Everybody can be a winner. No large sums of money needed. Helping each other (with exchanging plants we are craving for and also with later problems in growing process) that is a way to go and make ourselves and others happy. I dont know about US growers but the ones I know from Czech republic and Slovakia are not the way you described. (The case fo having to sign a stipulation is unbelievable!)From my experience I have to say people on this forum are great and willing to help as well! THANK YOU! I think if most of the CP growers think this way we can put greedy people out of business;-)

  6. #22
    klasac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Myjava Slovakia
    Posts
    288
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Wow you are fast! Thanx Tamlin for exhausting answer on how to grow this wonderful species! I had d. montana var. tomentosa......4 plants and when they produced seed I gave it away and the plants died 3 months later (have no idea why so suddenly).I should have kept some but the plants were doing so wel it didnt even cross my mind that they could actually die. I guess these species are well known dying when expected the least!

  7. #23
    Av8tor1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    4,811
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My experiences are somewhat different, I have grown this species consistantly for about 5 years now, It has been my experience that it prefers cool and humid highland conditions.

    I have tried several substrates and found LFS or live sphag based mixes to work best, the roots grow extremely long and extremely quick.... easily exceeding 8 or 9 inches in short time so give it a deep home, the "root" likes to grow straight down

    I have had zero luck with leaf cuttings after trying every method I have read about or could think of but root cuttings are practically a sure thing

    here is one in its full glory:



    Butch

  8. #24

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hahaha, most Europeans are all plant sharing degenerates. My kind of people. Man, the stories I could tell you of kindness above and beyond the call of CP duty. At the same time I was brushed off like old dandruff from other notables (not having the right material for trade). Just goes to show there are passionate and indifferent souls all over this mudball. I am pleased you missed the fun I had with certain individuals here and abroad. The regular growers all have golden hearts, it's just the rare material they don't have. Yet.

    I love the trade arragement made with your friend, esp. the offer of free replacement! That IS a win win scenario superior in every way to commercial exchange for the same material (plus YOU made out, you old dog!)

    Still, those that are selling any Aussie tubers better not be digging up Oz to get them, and anyone signing papers probably will get just what they deserve. I sort of think those papers were to keep the material away from ME.

    My goal remains to have as many successful growers wildly sharing and recruiting new growers because they have sooooo many spare plants to give away they're drowning in them. If I ruffle some feathers in the process, some birds deserve it. So I continue to teach what I know.

    Anyways, this is all old history. I am no longer a threat since I no longer grow these plants. But I made a whole lot of happy ripples in the worldwide pond for the 5 years I was active in distribution. I hope to become well enough to grow again this season and hopefully can borrow some plants without the need to dance with Mammon and pass them on three times over by the seasons end. I really miss growing, and sharing even more.

    Thanks again for allowing me to pontificate a bit on my beliefs, and for all your fine contributions here at TF.
    "Grow More, Share More"

Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. D. graomogolensis
    By Glenn in forum Sundews (Drosera), Byblis, Drosophyllum
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 08-15-2006, 03:31 PM
  2. D. graomogolensis
    By Amateur_Expert in forum Carnivorous Plant Trading Post
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-20-2004, 09:38 PM
  3. Drosera graomogolensis photo
    By Tamlin Dawnstar in forum Sundews (Drosera), Byblis, Drosophyllum
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 07-06-2004, 10:14 AM
  4. Drosera ascendens - villosa - graomogolensis
    By Christian Dietz in forum Sundews (Drosera), Byblis, Drosophyllum
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 01-22-2004, 11:24 AM
  5. Drosera graomogolensis
    By Tamlin Dawnstar in forum Sundews (Drosera), Byblis, Drosophyllum
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 12-01-2003, 08:29 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •