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Thread: Drosera self-pollination?

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    Veronis's Avatar
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    Drosera self-pollination?

    I have a drosera dielsiana that's starting to put up a flower stalk; I've read that d. dielsiana can self-pollinate, which tells me it doesn't need a second flower from another plant to be present.

    Does this also mean that it will basically flower and produce seed on its own with no help at all, or do I still need to take an artist brush to it in order to get it to self-pollinate?

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    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    I believe self-pollinating more or less means, "if you don't kill the flower, it will set seed all by itself." Flowers that need intervention, but are genetically compatible with their own pollen, are self-fertile. However, some people use the two terms interchangeably in a less distinct sense.
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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    They should be self-fertile/pollinating. They're somewhat weedy/invasive. Hand pollinate if you wish, you'll probably get a better seed set if that's what you want.
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    Quote Originally Posted by seedjar View Post
    I believe self-pollinating more or less means, "if you don't kill the flower, it will set seed all by itself." Flowers that need intervention, but are genetically compatible with their own pollen, are self-fertile. However, some people use the two terms interchangeably in a less distinct sense.
    ~Joe
    To add some examples to this:

    - self-pollinating (& therefore self-fertile) > many/most dews like D. filiformis, D. capensis, etc. (most of the plants that are often considered 'weedy')

    - self-fertile but not self-pollinating > D. regia (from what I understand) & VFTs. Typically the stigma becomes receptive after the peak of pollen production. While self-pollination sometimes happens, the plants have evolved a mechanism to reduce the likelihood. With VFTs, it's very obvious to watch the stigma open up and become receptive (usually 1-2 days after the flower opens).

    - neither self-pollinating nor self-fertile > the petiolaris group is a good example of this. These plants require pollen from a different seed clone to set seed.
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