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Thread: some plants easy propagating with leaf cuttings

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    RL7836's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by geffcardo View Post
    those are amazing
    too bad u didnt post up a vid of how did the cuttings step by step, i wouldve love to c it
    also how long did new growth appear?
    I don't know which method Klasac used but here's a step-by-step approach that works well for many dews.

    I've also found D. ascendens to be quite prolific with water propagation (multiple strikes on 100% of leaves). My experience w/ D. villosa - fewer strikes per leaf & some leafs w/ no strikes at all - and they took longer to strike than ascendens (side-by-side).
    All the best,
    Ron
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    Quote Originally Posted by RL7836 View Post
    I don't know which method Klasac used but here's a step-by-step approach that works well for many dews.

    I've also found D. ascendens to be quite prolific with water propagation (multiple strikes on 100% of leaves). My experience w/ D. villosa - fewer strikes per leaf & some leafs w/ no strikes at all - and they took longer to strike than ascendens (side-by-side).
    wow thank you very much

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    Hi! Thanx for the nice comments. I did not make a video of taking the leaf cuttings. I will, when I get a tripod for my camera (or grow a third arm;-))). But there is really not much to be camcorded. I simply cut the leaf off as close to the base as possible, using a pair of scissors. The reason why I didnt use leaf pullings is, that some leaves are really stubborn to be torn off of the mother plant and you might accidentally hurt the plant severely (which, in case of more precious species such as graminifolia, roraimae or camporupestris might be lethal). Using leaf pullings instead of leaf cuttings does not amke any difference anyways (unless you are propagating petiolaris group).
    Now I noticed the new plants form much earlier and in bigger numbers on older, almost dying leaves. Using young fresh leaves causes slower growth (if any), and the plants are fewer (which is kinda weird, since on TC it is the other way around!)
    Now I do not use water method. Although it works great for propagation rate, the plants are etiolated and seem kind of weak and take longer to adjust to substrate (With some 'weedy sundews' there is not much difference).
    I use paper tissue/peat method, which has 2 stages. I put some inch thick layer of peat/sand (50/50) mix inside a plastic food container. Then I cover it with thick paper tissue and let it soak with water. Then I simply place the cuttings on the surface and cover it with food foil to ensure almost 100%humidity.
    Then I keep the tray in a shadowy area (I noticed some species dont form buds in light well). The temps are kept quite cold, 13-17night/18-22day. After about a month, first growth appears.
    Then the second stage commences, I remove the paper tissue and place the unrooted plantlets with leaf residue directly onto the substrate, place it in warmer area that gets enough light. Once the plantlets root, they will start growing really fast (especially when fed properly).
    When they are big enough I repot them and place in a terrarium with other plants.

    ...and I agree, d ascendens is very prolific under these conditions. I never tried villosa, but will try graomogolensis and other species soon:-) GOOD LUCK EVERYBODY!

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    wow thank u very much for that info
    i will try that to my aliciae

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    CPlantaholic's Avatar
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    That method is certainly new to me. Very interesting. A few questions though- what is the difference between using a sponge below the paper towel versus peat? I would also be interested in pictures of the final wrapped setup (also where the dim location is) when you get a chance, since I normally find my cuttings do better when they are nearly touching my fluorescent bulbs. Could be a difference other differences that make it this way though.
    Thanks,
    Aaron
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    Hi Aaron,
    the whole concept of using a clean tissue on the peat instead of laying the leaves directly on the peat is to inhibit the leaf tissue decay due to bacteria and other micro-organisms present in peat. In the first stage, when the adventitious buds are being formed, it is advantageous to preserve as many cells as possible to create as many buds as possible. Later, when the buds are formed, it is desired to make the decay faster to provide more nutrients to the young plants. Ideal case is, when the thickness of the tissue is such, that it decomposes after about a month, when the buds are formed. (No easy to time it properly since temperature and substrate quality plays an important role here, so I just remove the semi-decomposed cellulose tissue when the buds form leaves, so the young plants can root more easily). In case of species, that take really long time to develop buds on leaves, the presence of tissue helps a lot since without it the leaf just decomposes without having enough time to develop a bud.
    As for light, some species need initial darker period in order to create larger number of adventitious buds. (especially temperate sundews).
    Also, the cooler temperature serves the same purpose,the initial leaf decay is slower.
    The second stage is just as any other previously used method.
    This method works the best for me and I have tried many.
    Disadvantage is, that is not good for lasiocephala group since they demand rather warm conditions to form a new plant.

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