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Thread: How Can I Get Constant Dew Production?

  1. #9
    CPlantaholic's Avatar
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    Hmm...well in that case, not sure if I saw you mention this, but are you using the tray method?
    If not, you should use a taller tub, that extends either close to or above the top of your sundews (besides the binata, which can get out of control fast if in good conditions) This creates a microclimate that's about as humid as you can get. I've used this on a bunch of D. capensis and a smaller pot of D. rotundifolia in a school greenhouse that gets to 90F at the hottest part of the day and they manage to keep dew on their leaves all day now. Without the tub, the dew is blown off by the fans constantly blowing, and from the heat...just a thought

    Some pictures so you can visually see what I'm referring to: (there's about an inch of water in there most of the time)
    Last edited by CPlantaholic; 05-23-2010 at 09:14 PM. Reason: found a pic!
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  2. #10
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    well from what ive seen (agamadragon's) roseana does exceptional in our climate so does scorpiodes just plain outdoors. a greenhouse type thing other than to raise humidity is serving as a pressure cooker in our weather. and seeing as our humidity is well above 'high' that might just be hurting them more than anything. i would say take a few plants and stick them outside of that contraption because it might be them getting acclimated, it might too much sun, and or just too hot. so my opinion (just taking our climate into consideration) stick one in full sun outside of the greenhouse, stick one in a place where its getting dappled sun and see how the rest do in the greenhouse thing. see where they seem to be doing best and go that route. my 2 cents.
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  3. #11
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    I misread the misting reference. Sorry about that! Do you, or can you have a fan installed to remove heat?

  4. #12
    Charlatan lizasaur's Avatar
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    Plantaholic- yes, I am using the tray method. It'll end up being a stupidly tall tub as some of the plants are in 4" pots (i.e. my capensis), but that's a very good idea. Outside of the greenhouse I'd be concerned about everything being drowned by rain- how would you prevent that?
    Jafvortex- It's definitely pressurecookerish in there, but I checked today, and most of them had some level of dew. I'll keep in there (I've draped large palm leaves over the top to give them "partial shade"), because if I could keep it cooler in there, it'd be perfect, I think. I do think the sun is just too intense for them- I'll never forget one year, just having everything out without a dome or something, everything but some of the hardier Sarracenia died from the heat, and I wasn't keeping them any differently than I am now (i.e., no fertilizing, no tap water, etc).
    JimScott-A fan would be rather difficult to rig up, unfortunately. That is a very good idea though! Perhaps we'll see if the partial shade does the trick, otherwise I'll toy around with giving it some ventilation by either leaving one side unzipped or popping a few holes in the plastic.

  5. #13
    limeslide's Avatar
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    I keep most of my dews(with the exception of D. adelae and D. prolifera) are grown outside. They are in humidity-low baking hot conditions(usually 20% humidity and 95F temps in the hottest part of the day). They take it, and thrive in it. I grow them with the tray method. My plants are in tall tubs too, because of the Sarracenia they are being grown with.
    I just remove them when rain comes, since the tubs usually overflow.

  6. #14
    w03's Avatar
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    Dew production centers on 2 things:

    #1: Keeping the plants watered - the tray method is most commonly used.

    #2: Sunlight. Sundews (with some exceptions) need full, bright sunlight to produce dew. That's why they're called SUNdews.


    The high heat and humidity won't bother the easier species like spatulata and capensis (to a certain degree). I think the main reason you didn't see dew on your plants after putting them outside is that they need time to acclimate. Sundews usually take a few weeks to start producing dew after going to a new environment. The hot, dry Florida sun you said was the "problem" is actually the solution. As a bonus, your plants will be healthier and more colorful in the long run. By the way, the dew is not water, but a special mucilage with different proteins and sugars in it, which is why misting doesn't really help.

    I live in San Diego where it gets up to 100F in the summer and even my local nursery grows amazing looking sundews outdoors all year. Obviously, low humidity and scorching temperatures are quite easily tolerated by many species.

    If you really think the sun is too much for the plants, get some shade cloth to drape over them and keep the water trays filled with cool (not cold) water.

    EDIT: I looked on your growlist, and the venusta, adelae, and aliciae definitely do not like hot temps. Those (especially the adelae) will need partial shading and will do better with cool nights.

    Happy growing!
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  7. #15
    CPlantaholic's Avatar
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    as for the tray method outdoors, you can drill several holes 1 inch or 3/4 inch into the tray, where you don't want the water to rise above outdoors.

    I've had the best luck acclimating sundews in partial shade, and then I ended up leaving them in partial shade for the rest of the summer since they were doing so well.

    But obviously, as w03 said, if they are able to handle it-generally speaking- the more sun, the better.
    In my case, the dew gets "fried off" in bright light/ slight breeze/higher temps outdoors unless I use the taller tray (color should be white or clear preferably to minimize heat retention), since the plant doesn't have to waste as much water via transpiration loss if the humidity is as high as possible during the hottest portion of the day.

    But these are only my experiences (in Iowa), and I can't speak for how they will actually do for you or other growers further south.
    Best of luck.
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  8. #16
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by w03 View Post
    #2: Sunlight. Sundews (with some exceptions) need full, bright sunlight to produce dew. That's why they're called SUNdews.
    All the literature I've read says they are called sundews because unlike other plants which only have dew in the early morning they retain their dew while the sun is up.
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