User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 17 to 22 of 22

Thread: Dormancy or not?

  1. #17
    SirKristoff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Puyallup, WA United States
    Posts
    4,132
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    So they did prove it was a hybrid with rotund then? I was unaware of this as i still find a ton of mixed expressions on it, and nothing on hybridization when i search tokaiensis and not xTokaiensis... NaN was there a paper written or anything publishing these findings?

    ---------- Post added at 10:14 AM ---------- Previous post was at 10:12 AM ----------

    If it is the same thing Dewy, no it doesnt.... NaN also, this is one of the few natural drosera hybrids that produce viable seed then, huh?

  2. #18
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    7,506
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/j...TRY=1&SRETRY=0

    I don't have the full paper but the abstract suggests that D. x tokiaensis has dormancy traits from both parents but not to either extreme. As such I would guess most of the these plants have a relaxed dormancy requirement. In other words they will go dormant if you let them but otherwise will survive long term without it. Note there are temperate forms of D. spatulata that have dormancy.

    See also Nakamura, T. & Ueda, K. 1991, Phytogeography of Tokai Hilly Land Element II. Taxonomic Study of Drosera tokaiensis (Komiya & Shibata) T. Nakamura & Ueda (Droseraceae), Acta Phytotax. Geobot., 42: 125-137

    As for fertile seeds, yes, being an amphidiploid. When people got around to looking at the genetics of these plants it was obvious they were probably dealing with a hybrid - 2n=60 vs 20 for D. rotundifolia and 40 for D. spatulata
    Last edited by Not a Number; 07-20-2010 at 11:11 AM.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  3. #19

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    north carolina
    Posts
    805
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the info!! I'll just grow it in my terrarium indoors year round and see what happens, it's a pretty cool looking plant in that it looks a lot like spatulata but has leaves shaped a little more like rotundifolia.
    John 3:16
    My grow list/want list
    Prior to the funeral home visit, we heard ~ "Hey'all watch this ! !"

  4. #20
    CPlantaholic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Corn Field, Iowa
    Posts
    970
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yeah, I've grown my D. tokaiensis for 3 years outdoors during the summer and indoors under lights during the winter and they never went dormant or showed a decline in growth. I've seen a picture of D. tokaiensis forming a hibernacula before when the person's plants were subjected to cooler temps for an extended period of time. I've also read that they can tolerate up to ~100 F in their natural habitat
    Visit The Sundew Grow Guides: http://www.growsundews.com
    New- Drosera video tours & other sundew info, now on YouTube!

    Happy Growing!

  5. #21
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Western New York
    Posts
    18,768
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    From a website:

    The Drosera x tokaiensis, a very close relative of the Drosera spatulata, is a subtropical sundew that is easy to grow, likes bright indirect light, and does not require a dormancy.

    Grow it in a sunny windowsill or under fluorescent lights year round. It does well adjusting to lower humidity levels found in the home.

  6. #22

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
    Posts
    5,290
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For me, sometimes some of the plants would have a sort of winter dormancy, the length of the petioles becoming reduced and aggregated loosely in the center of the plant: not true hibernacula as in D. rotundifolia. Best kept cool if this happens, but not frozen or they will die, They look pretty sad when it happens and are weak. Sometimes they would recover, sometimes not. I assume the differing genomes in different plants are why some do and some don't. Never force the issue, just cooperate with whatever the plant does, reducing water, maintaining good air circulation and good light if they seem to be petering out. Unless they go all black, they have a chance of returning if you do the right things. Always save your seed of this species!
    "Grow More, Share More"

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Similar Threads

  1. Dormancy?
    By Overmind1632 in forum Venus Flytrap (Dionaea ) Care Information & Tips
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 09-06-2007, 01:45 PM
  2. Another dormancy ?
    By CP30 in forum General Discussions
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-19-2006, 02:17 PM
  3. Dormancy now?
    By athlon in forum Venus Flytrap (Dionaea ) Care Information & Tips
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 01-28-2006, 11:32 AM
  4. Dormancy
    By 7santiago in forum Venus Flytrap (Dionaea ) Care Information & Tips
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-07-2005, 05:46 PM
  5. Dormancy in va
    By VTPTFATHAVFT in forum Venus Flytrap (Dionaea ) Care Information & Tips
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 05-05-2004, 05:10 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •