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Thread: pygmies dormant now?

  1. #9
    mark.ca's Avatar
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    Jim, something is off. My plants experience temps of 85-95 all summer long and only a few species like closterostigma, eneabba, miniata and androsacea go dormant. I have 50% shade cloth on the greenhouse from spring to fall and a good air flow. Like i said before, i water when i see the top getting dry by adding 1-2" of water. Hope this helps.
    Last edited by mark.ca; 08-07-2010 at 12:05 PM.
    Best regards,
    Marius

    My Website: http://droseragemmae.com/

  2. #10
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    I don't know what the issue is. I just rearranged these plants, so these pictures aren't representative of how they have been juxtaposed. I had every pygmy pot on the first row of each tier of the rack, for maximum lighting. I just rotated the plants 90 degrees in the first picture. These are lousy pictures, but you get the idea!








    Notice that the D. pulchella, carburup, mannii, helodes, omissa, badgerup,... look great. Notice that the lasiantha, callistos, enodes, andrsaceae, allantostigma,... look like garbage. Some plants have stipules where the crown is green. Some have stipules and all looks brown. Notice that the two lasianthas that flowered.. appear dead. They have all been under the same conditions, distilled water, fed freezed dried bloodworms (pulverized), same lighting, same temps, same treatment. They all sprouted well and did well through the spring. Then I hit a wall in the summer.

    ---------- Post added at 09:34 AM ---------- Previous post was at 09:33 AM ----------

    Next year I will invest in taller pots and only do watering the trays. Gemmae will be given new pots and fresh media of sand and peat.

  3. #11
    I hate bugs. Carnivorous plants get me. jpappy789's Avatar
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    So it seems like some species can make the transition from outdoors to indoors but others cannot?

    I am interested in getting quite a few pygmies (Lake Badgerup, nitidula x pulchella, palacea, roseana, and scorpiodes) but being in a climate where year round growing is impossible I would too have to bring them inside eventually.

    Would it be better to grow outside and then move inside or just keep them inside under strong growlights year round so the transition doesn't induce dormancy?

    Knowing that dormancy is not recommended eases my worries about providing the pygmies with a suitable climate each season. I assume this just means the tray needs to constantly stay wet?
    -Josh
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  4. #12

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    I always took advantage of outdoor growing as much as possible. During the cold months when gemmae are forming the plants here needed to be protected. I used twin tube fluorescent fixtures with the crowns nearly touching the tubes for these plants and the newly sown gemmae pots. As soon as the weather permitted everything went outside in April, grown in tray water a couple inches deep where they remained all summer unless showing signs of dormancy Notably difficult species had gemmae sown in deep narrow pots to encourage deep rooting, needed IF there were signs of incipient summer dormancy to maintain surface dryness. From my experience, these sensitive plants did better again under the lights inside on open racks again very close to the lights, with a small fan to circulate the air. They were less stressed indoors and more likely to return from their dormancy. These plants were then watered by immersion for about 5 mins. in tray water weekly, then placed on a rack with no additional water during the week until good new growth was evident from the mass of protective stipules at which time they went pack outside until the onset of cold weather, as mentioned above. It was all hit or miss. Some few of the noted sensitive types remained in active growth, but the dry summer spell didn't really affect them. They remained actively growing while individuals right next to them went dormant. Of the dormant examples, I would always lose some individuals. The non sensitive types just stayed outdoors in 2 inches of water in full sun from April until frost was predicted, then indoors close to the lights as possible. Some would rest after flowering, and looked pretty ratty but didn't reach a true dormant condition. These types I allowed the trays to dry before refilling. It's interesting to note that even in bone dry conditions many species stayed active and growing with good dew, long after most other genera and species would have bit the dust. I also had them underwater for over a week with no ill effect.
    Very tough plants they were!
    "Grow More, Share More"

  5. #13
    I hate bugs. Carnivorous plants get me. jpappy789's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tips Tamlin!
    -Josh
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    mark.ca's Avatar
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    Jim, i can't tell from your pic if you have something there for air circulation or not. Your temps in the house may not get high but there near the window, in full sun it can get hot. Maybe shade the sensitive ones and give them only artificial light. Enodes is a swamp growing pygmy and it does not go dormant that easy. I don't like the size of your pots either. Top watering has its goods and bads. It's good that you can flush salts by top watering but it's bad because the roots may be disturbed if you are not very careful. That lasiantha is dead. If they turn completely brown...RIP!
    I would try next year a few outside and start under a 60% shade cloth and go from there. I agree that outside they tend to grow stronger and have more color....but also stay smaller than the ones grown in GH or under lights.
    Best regards,
    Marius

    My Website: http://droseragemmae.com/

  7. #15
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Just so you all know, Tamlin and I live ~125 mile apart. He gets Lake Ontario and I get Lake Erie for winter fun! What he can do outside is what I can do outside.

    Modifications will be made for next year. I stumbled upon a nursery wholesaler while looking for more 2" pots, 6 months ago. When I asked why I needed them I told her that I grow carnivorous plants. Instead of the usual ,"you grow what?" response, it sparked an interest and a query about getting her a "cobra plant". From there I bring her extra sundews and butterworts and she supplies me with pots. She is also willing to house my temperates for the winter, in what would be just above freezing temps. All that is to say is that I can get any shape and sized pots I need.

    I plan to catalogue which ones struggle through the summer. Marius: I have no fan blowing on the plants. They're just on a 4-tier grow rack, totally exposed to the air. I'm sure the temp rises a little in the afternoon, but not a whole lot. The closest the rack is to the window is ~9" away. The other factor limiting light and temperature, aside from AC, is that a couple months on either side of the summer solstice the sun is too vertical to shine in, being cut off by the roof gutters, at least on the top 2 racks. Even the bottom 2 racks it gets cut off past the first 2 rows. That's why I need the artificial lighting. I also have the fixtures tilted so it doesn't further cut off what shines through the glass doors. I'll also skip the top-watering for them and reserve that for something like D. aliciae.

    Tamlin: which ones gave you the most trouble? I can say that pulchella, omissa, patens, badgerup, carburup, manni, dischrosepala, palaceae, helods, and sargenti seem to be the most easy-going. D. scorpioides and androsacea can be a small problem but not insurmountable.

    Josh: Whaddya think?

  8. #16
    kulamauiman's Avatar
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    pulchella and scorpinoides dont like me.

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