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Thread: Sundew Woes

  1. #25
    Aristoloingulamata Dexenthes's Avatar
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    No, very true, they do not need it. I was just defending my misting addiction.


    I'm afraid to let them go without it now. It's kind of like training wheels for Nepenthes.
    LOOKING FOR: N. (argentii x bicalcarata) x {[(lingulata x edwardsiana) x (naga x hamata)] x [(klossii x undulatifolia) x (aristolochioides x rajah)]} Growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=124586

  2. #26
    Oh, the humanity!! TheFury's Avatar
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    Those Nepenthes are gorgeous! I actually just got a rather large N. mirabilis basal from a very generous TF member and am currently in the process of rooting it up. Hoping it can make a happy windowsill plant like yours, Presto.

    Even after just a few days, this increased photoperiod is really having an effect. Dew production has definitely ramped up. Hopefully after another week or two I'll start seeing more color and resumed growth!

    I just took some wet Q-tips to the crowns of my D. aliciae. Even after 5 Q-tips, using both sides, the largest of my D. aliciae was still giving off tons of brown goo. After that, I hit the crowns with a jet of pure RO water from a syringe. The humic acid isn't all gone, but hopefully I got rid of enough of it to allow normal growth to resume.

    Now - let's say, hypothetically, that after changing my watering habits and stopping all this misting nonsense, I still have problems with humic acid buildup. That would definitely indicate a problem with the soil, right? I noticed that the top of the media in my D. aliciae pot looks like mainly sand... as if the peat has sunk beneath the surface. Is this a problem? Should I repot into some peatier mix or are sundews such as these more or less tolerant to sand-heavy mixes?

  3. #27
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Generally speaking, I find that top-watering D. aliciae works as a preventative to blackening crowns.

  4. #28
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    As I said previously,
    Quote Originally Posted by Not a Number View Post
    To get rid of it permanently flush your media out to remove the excess substances from the mix.
    Discard the runoff. The compounds will eventually flush out and no more problem. I tried the swabbing it off. It's a waste of time. If you rinse it off without flushing the media the compounds just get wicked up again. This tends to happen with newly mixed peat moss. Repotting will just start over with high levels of the compounds leading to this phenomenon. Unless you just happen to get a batch of peat moss out of the bag naturally low in the compounds. Refer to Tamlin's posts about thoroughly flushing peat moss before using.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  5. #29
    Oh, the humanity!! TheFury's Avatar
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    Alright alright, you caught me beating a dead horse .

    I just flushed the media by putting it under my RO tap for a good half hour. I'm guessing about a half gallon of water ran through it over that time. At first, I noticed water was sort of pooling up at the top of the pot. No good. So, I took the opportunity to examine the media a little more closely. I didn't uproot the plants but I did scoop them out with their root balls. Turns out that the top layer of the media was thick; almost stiff. I have no idea what it was. But I did break that cake up and loosen the media a little, and now it drains much better. Maybe that was why these plants were always mad at me - they were totally waterlogged all the time because their pot didn't drain well enough.

    I will keep folks posted with results as they unfold!

  6. #30
    Oh, the humanity!! TheFury's Avatar
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    OK, What??

    After just having swabbed the crowns of my D. aliciae a few days ago, one of them is ALREADY black with humic acid again. I've been careful with the water, and I've flushed the media out.

    As the condition of these plants continues to worsen, I've decided to take some leaf cuttings in hopes of propagating a new generation of plants.

    This weekend I might mix up another batch of media, following the method on growsundews.com to rinse the peat, and will use perlite rather than some random (and perhaps salty) sand that I'm using this time. After that I'll repot, cross my fingers, and wait.

    How frustrating.

  7. #31
    CPlantaholic's Avatar
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    Hey Fury,
    If possible, I would HIGHLY recommend purchasing silica sand, since perlite will likely not help with the drainage problem. Are you pretty much letting the media dry out in that pot? If not, the humic acids will continue to wick up onto the crown. The key is letting the media dry out a lot more if it's still occurring.

    Otherwise, it might be beneficial to start off with rinsed media (which is strongly recommended by Tamlin- whom I adapted that rinsing technique from)

    As a side note, I actually tried a weird/funny thing that surprisingly worked- I one time had to uproot a plant of D. aliciae that was crowding out another of my sundews. I broke off the roots and tried placing the top of the plant in a shallow clear salad dressing container (not sure what to call it). My initial experiment was to see if the leaves would strike plantlets if the leaves were still attached to the mother plant. I put enough water so the plant was initially submerged, but now the leaves are all growing above the water level. But oddly enough, a year later, the plant has continued growing well, looks healthier than ever, and is developing some really nice-sized leaves and roots. Best part is that humic acids can't develop! I haven't fed it either, so I'm surprised that it's growing this well. So that would be another option for making a back-up... I will try to upload a pic of this in the next few weeks.
    Visit The Sundew Grow Guides: http://www.growsundews.com
    New- Drosera video tours & other sundew info, now on YouTube!

    Happy Growing!

  8. #32
    Oh, the humanity!! TheFury's Avatar
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    Man, I have searched high and low in Brooklyn, and I can't find silica sand. I get blank stares at all the hardware stores, even Lowes and Home Depot. The drainage problem I had was probably a result of either packing the media itself too tight or packing the bottom dressing of LFS too tight (I use LFS to keep my media from falling out the bottom of my pots). The sand itself might also be far too fine - I don't have a good way to gauge what the ideal grit size is (20 or 30, right?) compared to this stuff--I use Mosser Lee Desert Sand.

    If I want to use sand, it has to be stuff that I can get in small bags - not gonna purchase a huge 50 lb sack of play sand or something because it would take up my entire friggin' apartment. Anyone out there in NYC know where I can get some good silica?

    The media I'm using is actually rinsed a few times with boiling water, sterilized with a 1/10 strength bleach solution, rinsed again, dechlorinated, and then rinsed a few more times. But what I didn't do is wring the peat out - I just poured as much water off as I could. That might be the problem. My next batch that I'm probably going to whip up this weekend will follow your method (I can't follow Tamlin's because I don't have an outdoor wire rack on which to place my many pots for the rainy season )

    Now you're saying you can grow your D. aliciae floating in nothing but water? And I can't even grow them in bloody peat moss??

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