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Thread: Sand Mulch

  1. #9
    Come To The Light. . . JB in Utah's Avatar
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    I've tried sand mulch on a few plants, all non-cps and it is great. I've heard that a 1 cm layer of horticultural gravel also does a great job, but I've never tested this myself.
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    Kinabalufan's Avatar
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    i grow all my pygmys with a sand layer i just swo the gemmae on top of the sand there roots grow throw that quickly it makes the plants stand out against the lighter colour wich looks good and i guess the plants have a fighting chance against moss etc. Cant see how you could grow pygmys without doing this ha ha.
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    those that sow and grow pygmies on sand, do you top water or go strictly with tray method?
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    Never Knows Best gill_za's Avatar
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    I have used a layer of sand on my S. Purpurea and on P. primuriflora with great success. It does slow down the growth of algae and cyanobacteria. I also resently used sand as dressing for D. filiformis.

    Can trichoderma granules (Ampac biotech for example) be used against cyanobacteria?

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    Kinabalufan's Avatar
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    I use the tray method and have saran wrap over the top initially I give the the surface a spray of water to wet it. the plastic keeps the gemmae wet enough to sprout. sometimes once the wrap is removed the sand layer dries out compleatly but the roots are deep enough that it doesnt bother the plants.
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    SDCPs's Avatar
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    The only problem with sand on top is it's easy to think the plants need water. Maybe gravel would be a better choice?

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    i have a question concerning how the mulch deters fungus gnats. Does it physically stop the gnats from laying eggs or does the gnat sense the mulch layer and decide it wouldn't be a good place for its spawn to hatch?

    The reason I ask is because I have gravel I can use as a mulch but it will be difficult to completely cover the surface around some of my younger/smaller sundews. If the mulch acts as a behavioral deterrent would this be okay?

    Attachment 1665

    If not, I can fill in the gaps with sand. I'm still curious whether the mulch layer (sand or otherwise) acts as a behavioral or physical deterrent.
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    Never Knows Best gill_za's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pik View Post
    i have a question concerning how the mulch deters fungus gnats. Does it physically stop the gnats from laying eggs or does the gnat sense the mulch layer and decide it wouldn't be a good place for its spawn to hatch?

    The reason I ask is because I have gravel I can use as a mulch but it will be difficult to completely cover the surface around some of my younger/smaller sundews. If the mulch acts as a behavioral deterrent would this be okay?

    Attachment 1665

    If not, I can fill in the gaps with sand. I'm still curious whether the mulch layer (sand or otherwise) acts as a behavioral or physical deterrent.
    I'm not an expert but my understanding is that a gnat will lay its eggs on the soil rich with the nutrients. The sand (most of the time) covers the soil and prevents algae/cyanobacteria and other unwanted cohabitants from growing thus no food/no gnats.

    Another reasoning might be that the sand grains when used as mulch do not expose that many paths for the gnat to crawl through and reach the soil.

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